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Advances in Developing Human Resources
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Advances in Developing Human Resources

Published in Association with Academy of Human Resource Development

Editor
Michael P. Leimbach Wilson Learning Worldwide, USA


eISSN: 15523055 | ISSN: 15234223 | Current volume: 19 | Current issue: 4 Frequency: Quarterly

From Research to Practice

Advances in Developing Human Resources (ADHR) focuses on the issues that help you work more effectively in human resource development. The journal spans the realms of performance, learning, and integrity within an organizational context. Balancing theory and practice, each Issue of the journal is devoted to a different topic central to the development of human resources. ADHR has covered subjects as wide-ranging and vital as performance improvement, action learning, on-the-job training, informal learning, how HRD relates to the new global economy, leadership, and the philosophical foundations of HRD practice.

Current and Concise

Each Issue of ADHR focuses on a single topic of importance to HRD professionals. Special guest editors propose a thematic emphasis for each issue. Experts in their specific fields, they receive papers from some of the most noted professionals in HRD today. Each special Issue is comprehensive yet concise, giving full coverage to each specific subject area.

Dynamic and Relevant

ADHR is easy to read and is highly relevant to both scholars and practitioners. Dealing with the demands of the global economy a diverse workforce can be difficult. From ethics to on-the-job training, from leadership development to action learning to cultural competence, ADHR gives you a quick, easy-to-use reference on each area important in your practice. Complete your library of HRD literature with the comprehensive coverage in ADHR – the essential tool for human resource development specialists.



Each issue of Advances in Developing Human Resources is also available for course adoption or for use in a training environment. Multiple quantity discounts apply. Contact Customer Service toll-free at 1-800-818-7243 for more information.

This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

Advances in Developing Human Resources is a quarterly journal whose single issues explore and examine discrete topics. These single issues (or "back issues," once the subsequent issue is published) are available individually or in quantities for use in a classroom or training environment. Balancing practice, theory, and readability, each issue is devoted to important and timely topics related to the development of human resources. The content of the journal spans the realms of performance, learning, and integrity within an organizational context. Readable and relevant to practitioners, each issue is grounded in sound research and theory and edited by a top scholar in the field.

Editor-in- Chief
Michael P. Leimbach Wilson Learning Worldwide, USA
Associate Editors
Marilyn Y. Byrd, PhD The University of Oklahoma, USA
Rochell McWhorter University of Texas at Tyler, USA
Jason Moats Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service, USA
Alina M. Waite Indiana State University, USA
Editorial Assistant
Editorial Board
Mesut Akdere Purdue University, USA
Meera Alagaraja Univeristy of Louisville, USA
Mary V. Alfred Texas A&M University, USA
Claire Armstrong Dublin City University, Ireland
Ross E. Azevedo University of Minnesota, USA
Elisabeth Bennett Northeastern University, USA
Maria Cseh George Washington University, USA
Sara Csillag Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary
Khalil M. Dirani University of Georgia, USA
Gareth Edwards University of the West of England, UK
Laura Esparza Universidad de Monterrey, Mexico
Barbara A. W. Eversole Indiana State University, USA
Thomas N. Garavan Edinburgh Napier Business School, Scotland
Julie Gedro Empire State College, USA
Rod Githens Drexel University, USA
Carroll M. Graham Indiana State University, USA
Vivienne Griggs Leeds Beckett University, UK
Linda M. Hite Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
Karen Johnson University of North Texas, USA
Baek-Kyoo (Brian) Joo Winona State University, USA
Jeffrey M. Keefer New York University, Visiting Nurse Service of New York, USA
Namhee Kim Northcentral University, USA
Judith A. Kolb The Pennsylvania State University, USA
Rita Kowalski Work Life Consulting
Katharine E. Leigh Colorado State University, USA
Catherine Lombardozzi Learning 4 Learning Professionals, USA
Susan A. Lynham Colorado State University, USA
Ismail Maimunah Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia
Steven V. Manderscheid Concordia University, USA
Jane Maringka Circa HR Solutions, Australia
Kimberly S. McDonald Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
Heather S. McMillan Southeast Missouri State University, USA
Rochell McWhorter University of Texas at Tyler, USA
Liliana Mina University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Sarah E. Minnis Anthology Consulting
Fredrick M. Nafukho Texas A&M University, USA
Beatriz Padilla University Institute of Lisbon, Portugal
Hannah Rudstam Cornell University, USA
Wendy Ruona University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
Ellen Scully-Russ The George Washington University, USA
Brad Shuck University of Louisville, USA
Ralph Soule George Washington University, USA
James Stefanchin Eaton Corporation, USA
Kyle B. Stone Fort Hays State University
Alina M. Waite Indiana State University, USA
Nelson H. Wawire Kenyatta University, Kenya
Sue Williams University of Gloucestershire, UK
Robin Yap Phronetic International, Inc. Canada
Tuncay Yilmaz Sakarya University, Turkey
Seung Won Yoon Western Illinois University, USA
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  • Advances in Developing Human Resources (ADHR) is a quarterly journal whose single Issues explore and examine discrete topics. Its unique features include:

    Research to Practice: ADHR focuses on the issues that help you work more effectively in human resource development. The journal spans the realms of performance, learning, and integrity within an organizational context. Balancing theory and practice, each Issue of the journal is devoted to a different topic central to the development of human resources. ADHR has covered subjects as wide-ranging and vital as performance improvement, action learning, on-the-job training, informal learning, work-life balance, career development and HRD, leadership, and the philosophical foundations of HRD practice.

    Current and Concise: Each Issue of ADHR focuses on a single topic of importance to HRD professionals. Special guest editors lead each Issue. Experts in their specific fields, they coordinate papers from some of the most noted professionals in HRD today. Each special Issue is comprehensive yet concise, giving full coverage to each specific subject area.

    Dynamic and Relevant: ADHR is easy to read and is highly relevant to both scholars and practitioners. Dealing with the demands of the global economy a diverse workforce can be difficult. From ethics to on-the-job training, from leadership development to action learning to cultural competence, ADHR gives you a quick, easy-to-use reference on each area important in your practice. Complete your library of HRD literature with the comprehensive coverage in ADHR – the essential tool for human resource development specialists.

    Each Issue of Advances in Developing Human Resources is available for course adoption or for use in a training environment. Multiple quantity discounts apply.

    For more information about submitting a proposal, or to submit a proposal to ADHR, please contact:

    Michael P. Leimbach, Ph.D.
    Editor-in-Chief Advances in Developing Human Resources
    Wilson Learning Worldwide
    8000 West 78th Street, Suite 200.
    Edina, MN 55439
    Telephone (952)-828-8645
    E-mail Michael_Leimbach@wilsonlearning.com

    Guidelines for ADHR Issue Editors

    Each Issue of ADHR focuses on a significant problem or timely Issue related to the development of human resources in organizations and the larger society in which HRD functions. Issue Editors and article authors need to speak clearly and confidently about the theory, research, and best practices in a voice that can be understood by the greatest number of readers. While ADHR does not always report new research, what is reported must be grounded in and consistent with the best and latest research.

    Organization of the Special Issue. It is preferred that special Issues of ADHR be structured around problems, but this is not a requirement. Innovation in the content and organization of the monograph is encouraged. Short pullouts or sidebar stories or illustrations are also encouraged to break up the text and reading.

    •  Review Criteria. The Editorial Board for Advances in Developing Human Resources uses a two-tier double blind review process. The first tier is a double blind review of special Issue proposals by the editorial board. A majority of the reviewers must recommend acceptance with the final decision being made by the Editor-in-Chief. Recommendations for improvement are provided for accepted proposals. The review criteria are both scholarly and market sensitive. The criteria include:
    1. Relevance to the HRD profession*
    2. Potential for advancing theory of HRD*
    3. Potential for advancing the practice of HRD*
  • Proposal Requirements. Proposals for special Issues of ADHR should minimally include the following elements:
    1. Introduction (the overarching problem or question and an overview of the relevant research and competitive publications)
    2. Purpose of the Issue (concluding with direct statements in response to the review criteria—see above*)
    3. Table of contents (including authors)
    4. Article descriptions (300-400 word description of the purpose, content, and key features of each article. Be sure to make the link, in each article, to the overall purpose of the proposed Issue, the above review criteria*, and HRD very explicit)
    5. Editor and author bios (with full contact information for all contributors). Please do not include this information with each article description. Instead, include it as an appendix in the proposal document.
    6. Anticipated submission date of all manuscripts
    7. All cited and key references listed in APA format (6th edition)
    8. A thorough Issue Proposal typically runs between 10-15 pages in total length (not including Issue editor and author bios)
  • Manuscript Submission Requirements. The complete set of manuscripts for the Issue should conform to the following criteria (see past Issues as examples):
    1. Approximately 145 double-spaced manuscript pages or 45,000-50,000 words.
    2. Adherence to the American Psychological Association style requirements (6th Edition).
    3. Table of contents for the complete Issue.
    4. Preface can be by the Issue editor, a team of authors, or a guest author.
    5. Individual authors (including Issue editor) can appear on no more than two articles, including the Editorial (Preface).
    6. Abstract for each article (not to exceed 150 words).
    7. Four or five “Keywords” that describe each article.
    8. Author bios of 60-75 words included at end of each article.
    9. Separate list of author names, titles, addresses, and complete contact information (phone, fax, and e-mail
  • Manuscript Preparation. Manuscripts should be prepared using the APA Style Guide (Sixth Edition). All pages must be typed, double-spaced (including references, footnotes, and endnotes). Text must be in 12-point Times Roman. Block quotes may be single-spaced. Must include margins of 1inch on all the four sides and number all pages sequentially.
  • The manuscript should include four major sections(in this order): Title Page, Abstract, Main Body, and References.

    Sections in a manuscript may include the following (in this order): (1) Title page, (2) Abstract, (3) Keywords, (4) Text, (5) Notes, (6) References, (7) Tables, (8) Figures, and (9) Appendices.

    1. Title page. Please include the following:

    • Full article title
    • Acknowledgments and credits
    • Each author’s complete name and institutional affiliation(s)
    • Grant numbers and/or funding information
    • Corresponding author (name, address, phone/fax, e-mail)

    2. Abstract. Print the abstract (150 to 250 words) on a separate page headed by the full article title. Omit author(s)’s names.

    3. Text. Begin article text on a new page headed by the full article title.

    a. Headings and subheadings. Subheadings should indicate the organization of the content of the manuscript. Generally, three heading levels are sufficient to organize text. Level 1 heading should be Centered, Boldface, Upper & Lowercase, Level 2 heading should be Flush Left, Boldface, Upper & Lowercase, Level 3 heading should be Indented, boldface, lowercase paragraph heading that ends with a period, Level 4 heading should be Indented, boldface, italicized, lowercase paragraph heading that ends with a period, and Level 5 heading should be Indented, italicized, lowercase paragraph heading that ends with a period.

    b. Citations. For each text citation there must be a corresponding citation in the reference list and for each reference list citation there must be a corresponding text citation. Each corresponding citation must have identical spelling and year. Each text citation must include at least two pieces of information, author(s) and year of publication. Following are some examples of text citations:

    (i)Unknown Author: To cite worksthatdo not have an author, cite the source by its title in the signal phrase or use the first word or two in the parentheses. Eg. The findings are based on the study was done of students learning to format research papers ("Using XXX," 2001)

    (ii) Authors with the Same Last Name: use first initials with the last names to prevent confusion. Eg.(L. Hughes, 2001; P. Hughes, 1998)

    (iii) Two or More Works by the Same Author in the Same Year: For two sources by the same author in the same year, use lower-case letters (a, b, c) with the year to order the entries in the reference list. The lower-case letters should follow the year in the in-text citation.Eg.Research by Freud (1981a) illustrated that…

    (iv) Personal Communication: For letters, e-mails, interviews,and other person-to-person communication, citation should include the communicator's name, the fact that it was personal communication, and the date of the communication. Do not include personal communication in the reference list.Eg.(E. Clark, personal communication, January 4, 2009).

    (v) Unknown Author and Unknown Date: For citations with no author or date, use the title in the signal phrase or the first word or two of the title in the parentheses and use the abbreviation "n.d." (for "no date").Eg. The study conducted by of students and research division discovered that students succeeded with tutoring ("Tutoring and APA," n.d.).

    5. Notes. If explanatory notes are required for your manuscript, insert a number formatted in superscript following almost any punctuation mark. Footnote numbers should not follow dashes ( — ), and if they appear in a sentence in parentheses, the footnote number should be inserted within the parentheses. The Footnotes should be added at the bottom of the page after the references. The word “Footnotes” should be centered at the top of the page.

    6. References. Basic rules for the reference list:

    • The reference list should be arranged in alphabetical order according to the authors’ last names. 
    •  If there is more than one work by the same author, order them according to their publication date – oldest to newest (therefore a 2008 publication would appear before a 2009 publication).
    • When listing multiple authors of a source use “&” instead of “and”. 
    •  Capitalize only the first word of the title and of the subtitle, if there are one, and any proper names – i. e. only those words that are normally capitalized.
    • Italicize the title of the book, the title of the journal/serial and the title of the web document. 
    •  Manuscripts submitted to XXX [journal acronym] should strictly follow the XXX manual (xth edition) [style manual title with ed].
    • Every citation in text must have the detailed reference in the Reference section.
    • Every reference listed in the Reference section must be cited in text.
    •  Do not use “et al.” in the Reference list at the end; names of all authors of a publication should be listed there.

    Here are a few examples of commonly found references. For more examples please check APA(6th Ed).

    · Books:

    Book with place of publication--Airey, D. (2010). Logo design love: A guide to creating iconic brand identities. Berkeley, CA: New Riders.

    Book with editors & edition-- Collins, C., & Jackson, S. (Eds.). (2007). Sport in Aotearoa/New Zealand society. South Melbourne, Australia: Thomson.

    Book with author & publisher are the same-- MidCentral District Health Board. (2008). District annual plan 2008/09. Palmerston North, New Zealand: Author.

    Chapter in an edited book--Dear, J., & Underwood, M. (2007). What is the role of exercise in the prevention of back pain? In D. MacAuley& T. Best (Eds.), Evidence-based sports medicine (2nd ed., pp. 257-280). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

    · Periodicals:

    Journal article with more than one author (print)--Gabbett, T., Jenkins, D., & Abernethy, B. (2010). Physical collisions and injury during professional rugby league skills training. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 13(6), 578-583.

    Journal article – 8 or more authors-- Crooks, C., Ameratunga, R., Brewerton, M., Torok, M., Buetow, S., Brothers, S., … Jorgensen, P. (2010). Adverse reactions to food in New Zealand children aged 0-5 years. New Zealand Medical Journal, 123(1327). Retrieved from http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/123-1327/4469/

    · Internet Sources:

    Internet – no author, no date--Pet therapy. (n.d.). Retrieved from htttp://www.holisticonline.com/stress/stress_pet-therapy.htm

    Internet – Organisation / Corporate author-- SPCA New Zealand. (2011). Your dog may be dying from the heat [Press release]. Retrieved from

    http://www.rnzspca.org.nz/news/press-releases/360-your-dog-may-be-dying-...

    • Examples of various types of information sources:

    Act (statute / legislation)--Copyright Act 1994. (2011, October 7). Retrieved from http://www.legislation.govt.nz

    Blog post-- Liz and Ellory. (2011, January 19). The day of dread(s) [Web log post]. Retrieved from

    http://www.travelblog.org/Oceania/Australia/Victoria/Melbourne/St-Kilda/...

    Brochure / pamphlet (no author)--Ageing well: How to be the best you can be [Brochure]. (2009). Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Health.

    Conference Paper--Williams, J., &Seary, K. (2010). Bridging the divide: Scaffolding the learning experiences of the mature age student. In J. Terrell (Ed.), Making the links: Learning, teaching and high quality student outcomes. Proceedings of the 9th Conference of the New Zealand Association of Bridging Educators (pp. 104-116). Wellington, New Zealand.

    DVD / Video / Motion Picture (including Clickview&Youtube)--Gardiner, A., Curtis, C., & Michael, E. (Producers), &Waititi, T. (Director). (2010). Boy: Welcome to my interesting world [DVD]. New Zealand: Transmission.

    Magazine--Ng, A. (2011, October-December). Brush with history. Habitus, 13, 83-87.

    Newspaper article (no author)--Little blue penguins homeward bound. (2011, November 23). Manawatu Standard, p. 5

    Podcast (audio or video)--Rozaieski, B. (2011). Logan cabinet shoppe: Episode 37: Entertainment center molding [Video podcast]. Retrieved fromhttp://blip.tv/xxx

    Software (including apps--UBM Medica.(2010). iMIMS (Version1.2.0) [Mobile application software].Retrieved from http://itunes.apple.com

    Television programme--Flanagan, A., &Philipson, A. (Series producers & directors).(2011). 24 hours in A & E [Television series]. Belfast, Ireland: Channel 4.

    Thesis (print)--Smith, T. L. (2008). Change, choice and difference: The case of RN to BN degree programmes for registered nurses (Master’s thesis). Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.

    Thesis (online)--Mann, D. L. (2010). Vision and expertise for interceptive actions in sport (Doctoral dissertation, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia). Retrieved fromhttp://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/44704

    Non- English reference book, title translated in English

    Real Academia Espanola. (2001). Diccionario de la lenguaespanola [Dictionary of the Spanish Language] (22nded.). Madrid, Spain: Author

    IMPORTANT NOTE: To encourage a faster production process of your article, you are requested to closely adhere to the points above for references. Otherwise, it will entail a long process of solving copyeditor’s queries and may directly affect the publication time of your article. In case of any question, please contact the journal editor.

    7. Tables. They should be structured properly. Each table must have a clear and concise title. When appropriate, use the title to explain an abbreviation parenthetically.Eg.Comparison of Median Income of Adopted Children (AC) v. Foster Children (FC).Headings should be clear and brief.

    8. Figures. They should be numbered consecutively in the order in which they appear in the text and must include figure captions. Figures will appear in the published article in the order in which they are numbered initially. The figure resolution should be 300dpi at the time of submission.

    IMPORTANT: PERMISSION - The author(s) are responsible for securing permission to reproduce all copyrighted figures or materials before they are published in(journal acronym). A copy of the written permission must be included with the manuscript submission.

    9. Appendices. They should be lettered to distinguish from numbered tables and figures. Include a descriptive title for each appendix (e.g., “Appendix A. Variable Names and Definitions”).Cross-check text for accuracy against appendices.

    • IMPORTANT NOTE: To encourage a faster production process of your article, you are requested to closely adhere to the points above for references. Otherwise, it will entail a long process of solving copyeditor’s queries and may directly affect the publication time of your article. In case of any question, please contact the journal editor.

    • Manuscript Review and Editing. The full set of manuscripts is then sent out for a double blind review to three or more reviewers. This is the second double blind review in the two-tier process. Each article is judged on the following:

    1. Potential for advancement of HRD theory.
    2. Potential for advancement of HRD practice.
    3. Completeness of the ideas.
    4. Quality of the writing.
    5. Fit with the original purpose of the article and the special Issue.

    Note: Authors who want to refine the use of English in their manuscripts might consider utilizing the services of SPi, a non-affiliated company that offers Professional Editing Services to authors of journal articles in the areas of science, technology, medicine or the social sciences. SPi specializes in editing and correcting English-language manuscripts written by authors with a primary language other than English. Visit http://www.prof-editing.com for more information about SPi's Professional Editing Services, pricing and turn-around times, or to obtain a free quote or submit a manuscript for language polishing. Please be aware that SAGE has no affiliation with SPi and makes no endorsement of the company. Your use of their services in no way guarantees that your submission will ultimately be accepted. Any arrangement you enter into will be exclusively between yourself and SPi, and any costs incurred are the sole responsibility of the author.

    If you or your funder wish your article to be freely available online to nonsubscribers immediately upon publication (gold open access), you can opt for it to be included in SAGE Choice, subject to the payment of a publication fee. The manuscript submission and peer review procedure is unchanged. On acceptance of your article, you will be asked to let SAGE know directly if you are choosing SAGE Choice. To check journal eligibility and the publication fee, please visit SAGE Choice. For more information on open access options and compliance at SAGE, including self/author archiving deposits (green open access) visit SAGE Publishing Policies on our Journal Author Gateway.

    The Issue Editor is responsible for overseeing revision and final editing of all articles in the Issue. Once the final manuscript is submitted, it will go through standard copy editing and page proofs that will be sent to the Issue Editor and Editor-in-Chief. Issue Editors are responsible for communicating with authors about edits and gaining their approvals as needed.

    To view a further note to ADHR issue editors, please click here.

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