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An Introduction to Intercultural Communication
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An Introduction to Intercultural Communication
Identities in a Global Community

Ninth Edition
  • Fred E. Jandt - California State University, San Bernardino (Retired)
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October 2017 | 504 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc

“One of the best textbooks in intercultural communication for undergraduate students”
—Mo Bahk, California State University, San Bernardino

How does the Syrian refugee crisis, the election of Donald Trump, and the global rise of nationalism affect our ability to communicate and function across cultures? 

The highly anticipated Ninth Edition of An Introduction to Intercultural Communication prepares today’s students to successfully navigate our increasingly global community by integrating major current events into essential communication skills and concepts. To spark student interest, award-winning professor and best-selling author Fred E. Jandt offers unique insights into intercultural communication, at home and abroad, through an emphasis on history, culture, and popular media. Each chapter integrates material on social media, as well as extensive new examples from recent international news and events. Throughout the text, Jandt reinforces the important roles that our own stories, personal experiences, and self-reflection play in building our intercultural understanding and competence. 

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SAGE edge offers a robust online environment featuring an impressive array of free tools and resources for review, study, and further exploration, keeping both instructors and students on the cutting edge of teaching and learning. Learn more at edge.sagepub.com/jandt9e.

 
 
About the Author
 
Preface
 
Acknowledgments
 
Part 1. Culture as Context for Communication
 
Chapter 1. Defining Culture and Communication
Sources of Identity  
Religion and Identity  
National Identity  
Class and Identity  
Gender and Identity  
Race, Skin Color, and Identity  
Civilization and Identity  
Culture  
Subculture  
Ethnicity  
Co-Culture  
American Indians  
Subgroup  
Microculture  
Communication  
Cultural Definitions of Communication  
Confucian Perspectives on Communication  
Western Perspectives on Communication  
The Media of Intercultural Communication  
Human Couriers and Intermediaries  
Telephone  
Internet  
Social Media  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Note  
Readings  
 
Chapter 2. Barriers to Intercultural Communication
Anxiety  
Assuming Similarity Instead of Difference  
Ethnocentrism  
Stereotypes and Prejudice  
Stereotypes  
Negative Effects on Communication  
Case Study: Asian-Americans  
Prejudice  
Racism  
White Privilege  
Case Studies  
The Roma  
Japan and Korea  
Extended Case Study of Intercultural Communication Barriers: China and the United States  
Anxiety  
History  
Economy  
Population  
Regional Differences  
Assuming Similarity Instead of Difference  
Air Space  
South China Sea  
Broadcast Media and the Internet  
Ethnocentrism  
Status of Taiwan  
Tibet  
Human Rights and Free Speech  
Stereotypes and Prejudice  
Energy and Sustainability  
Economic Issues  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Part 2. Communication Variables
 
Chapter 3. Context, Perception, and Competence
High Versus Low Context  
The Concept of Face  
Perception  
Sensing  
Effect of Culture on Sensing  
Perceiving  
Selection  
Japanese/English Difficulties With Speech Sounds  
Organization  
Grouping Like Objects Together  
Interpretation  
Dogs as Pets or as Food  
Weather Vane as Christian Cross  
Case Study: Airport Security  
Intercultural Communication Competence  
Third Culture  
Multiculturalism  
Postethnic Cultures  
Intercultural Communication Ethics  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Note  
Readings  
 
Chapter 4. Nonverbal Communication
Nonverbal Behaviors  
Nonverbal Communication Functions  
Types of Nonverbal Communication  
Proxemics  
Territoriality  
Kinesics  
Chronemics  
Paralanguage  
Silence  
Haptics  
Artifactual Communication  
Olfactics  
Knowing Culture Through Nonverbal Messages  
Case Study: The Wai in Thailand  
Nonverbal Misinterpretations as a Barrier  
Case Study: Korean-American Neighborhood Businesses  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
 
Chapter 5. Language as a Barrier
Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis  
Development of the Hypothesis  
Vocabulary  
Grammar and Syntax  
Criticisms of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis  
Linguistic Relativism  
Case Study: Arabic and the Arab Culture  
Translation Problems  
Vocabulary Equivalence  
Idiomatic Equivalence  
Grammatical-Syntactical Equivalence  
Experiential Equivalence  
Conceptual Equivalence  
Human and Machine Translators  
Pidgins, Creoles, and Universal Languages  
Pidgins  
Creoles  
Esperanto  
Language as Nationalism  
Kiswahili in East Africa  
The Spread of English  
India  
South Africa  
Australia and New Zealand  
Canada  
United States  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Part 3. Cultural Values
 
Chapter 6. Dimensions of Nation-State Cultures
The Hofstede Dimensions  
Individualism Versus Collectivism  
Case Study: Singapore  
Masculinity Versus Femininity  
Power Distance  
Uncertainty Avoidance  
Long-Term Versus Short-Term Orientation  
Indulgence Versus Self-Restraint  
Environmental Sustainability  
The Trompenaars and Hampden-Turner Dimensions  
Case Study: Japan as a Homogeneous Culture  
Geography and History  
Population and Economy  
Cultural Patterns  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Chapter 7. Dominant U.S. Cultural Patterns Using Value Orientation Theory
Origins of U.S. Cultural Patterns  
Pre-16th Century Indigenous Americans  
European Enlightenment  
Regional Differences Resulting From Immigration  
Forces Toward the Development of a Dominant Culture  
Value Orientation Theory  
What is a Human Being’s Relation to Nature?  
The Individual-and-Nature Relationship  
Science and Technology  
Materialism  
What is the Modality of Human Activity?  
Activity and Work  
Efficiency and Practicality  
Progress and Change  
What is the Temporal Focus of Human Life?  
What is the Character of Innate Human Nature?  
Goodness  
Rationality  
Mutability  
What is the Relationship of the Individual to Others?  
Individualism  
Self-Motivation  
Social Organization  
Popular Acceptance of Dominant U.S. Cultural Patterns  
Forces Toward the Development of Regional Cultures  
The New Regions  
Social Class  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Note  
Readings  
 
Chapter 8. Religion and Identity
Hinduism  
Buddhism  
Japan  
Christianity  
Islam  
Muhammad, the Prophet  
The Qur’an  
Religious Practices  
The Arab States  
Saudi Arabia  
Geography  
Discovery of Oil  
Ruling Saud Family and Conservative Wahhabism  
Media  
Regional Instability  
Dominant Cultural Patterns  
Human Being-Nature Orientation  
Activity Orientation  
Time Orientation  
Human Nature Orientation  
Relational Orientation  
Role of Women  
Communication Barriers  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Chapter 9. Culture and Gender
Status of Women  
United Nations Studies  
World Economic Forum Study  
Health and Survival  
Economic Participation and Opportunity  
Political Participation  
Comparison of Individual Countries and Areas  
Nordic Countries  
Mexico  
China  
Japan  
South Korea  
India  
Sub-Saharan Africa  
Arab States  
Marriage  
Family Units  
Nonbinary Gender Identities  
Examples  
Cultural Status  
Gender Expression and Communication  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Part 4. Cultures Within Cultures
 
Chapter 10. Immigration and Acculturation
A World of Migration  
Immigration and National Identity  
Israel  
Europe  
Muslim Immigration  
Refugees  
Brazil  
First Wave  
Second Wave  
Third Wave  
Recent Immigration  
United States  
Colonial Policies on Immigration  
U.S. Policies on Immigration  
Contributing Countries Prior to 1800  
Contributing Countries Since 1800  
Immigration and Individual Identity  
Culture Shock  
Stages of Culture Shock  
Symptoms  
Reverse Culture Shock  
Predictors of Acculturation  
Effect of Media and Transportation Advances  
Categories of Acculturation  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Chapter 11. Cultures Within Cultures
Marginalization: The Hmong  
History  
Cultural Patterns  
Separation: Koreans in Russia  
Separation: The Amish  
History  
Diversity Among the Amish  
Values  
Worldview  
Activity Orientation  
Human Nature Orientation  
Relational Orientation  
Indigenous Cultures  
Assimilation: United States  
Melting Pot Concept  
Integration: United States  
English-Speaking Cultures  
Spanish-Speaking Cultures  
Hispanic Culture Within the U.S. Culture  
Values  
Cultural Identity and Media  
Print  
Radio  
Television  
Spanish-Language Internet and Social Media  
Spanish Language and Marketing  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Chapter 12. Identity and Subgroups
Argot  
Specialized Vocabulary  
Argot and Subgroup Identity  
Argot and Subgroup Boundaries  
Argot and Meaning  
Subgroup Media and Values  
Examples of Subgroups  
British Punk  
Corporate Cultures  
Case Study: Southwest Airlines  
Case Study: Google  
Homosexuality Worldwide  
Attitudes About Homosexuality and Same-sex Marriage  
Cultural Bases for Attitudes  
Sexual Orientation as a Basis for Subgroups  
Sexual Orientation and Othering  
Consequences of Othering  
Media and Othering  
Rejecting All Labels  
From Separation to Assimilation  
Evidence of Separate Status  
Integration or Assimilation of Subgroups  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Part 5. Applications
 
Chapter 13. Contact Between Cultures
Colonialism  
Hawai’i  
Australia  
Cultural Imperialism  
Development Communication  
Opinion Leadership and Change Agents  
Adopters  
Change Agent Ethics  
Case Study: Quality Circles  
Case Study: Vietnamese Nail Technicians  
Cultural Icons  
Cultural Hegemony  
Japanese Icon in Mexico  
U.S. Cultural Icons  
Coca-Cola®  
Disney  
McDonald’s  
KFC  
Spam®  
Nike  
Adapting the Message  
Case Study: Marketing Gerber Baby Foods Worldwide  
Case Study: Religious Missionary Work in New Guinea  
Adapting U.S. Icons  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Key Terms  
Readings  
 
Chapter 14. Future Challenges
Religion  
Class  
Gender  
Race, Skin Color, and Ethnicity  
Civilization  
Nation  
Threats to Culture  
Threats to the Environment  
Threats from Immigration  
The Promise of New Media  
A Final Word  
Summary  
Discussion Questions  
Readings  
 
Glossary
 
References
 
Index

Supplements

Instructor Site
SAGE edge offers a robust online environment featuring an impressive array of tools and resources for review, study, and further exploration, keeping both instructors and students on the cutting edge of teaching and learning. SAGE edge content is open access and available on demand. Learning and teaching has never been easier!

SAGE edge for Instructors supports teaching by making it easy to integrate quality content and create a rich learning environment for students.

  • Test banks provide a diverse range of prewritten options as well as the opportunity to edit any question and/or insert personalized questions to effectively assess students’ progress and understanding
  • Sample course syllabi for semester and quarter courses provide suggested models for structuring one’s course
  • Editable, chapter-specific PowerPoint® slides offer complete flexibility for creating a multimedia presentation for the course
  • EXCLUSIVE! Access to full-text SAGE journal articles have been carefully selected to support and expand on the concepts presented in each chapter to encourage students to think critically
  • Video and multimedia links that appeal to students with different learning styles
  • Web Exercises and meaningful web links facilitate student use of internet resources, further exploration of topics, and responses to critical thinking questions
  • Lecture notes summarize key concepts by chapter to ease preparation for lectures and class discussions
  • Discussion Questions address key issues and concepts appropriate for classroom discussion
  • Chapter Exercises give instructors ideas and instructions for how to bring the chapter content to the classroom creatively
  • SAGE’s course cartridges provide you with flexible, editable content in formats that import easily into your learning management system. Course cartridges include ­­test banks, PowerPoint® slides, and links to multimedia assets ­­to help you build an engaging, comprehensive course. SAGE’s course cartridges are compatible with many popular learning management systems.
Student Study Site

SAGE edge offers a robust online environment featuring an impressive array of tools and resources for review, study, and further exploration, keeping both instructors and students on the cutting edge of teaching and learning. SAGE edge content is open access and available on demand. Learning and teaching has never been easier!

SAGE edge for Students provides a personalized approach to help students accomplish their coursework goals in an easy-to-use learning environment.

  • Mobile-friendly eFlashcards strengthen understanding of key terms and concepts
  • Mobile-friendly practice quizzes allow for independent assessment by students of their mastery of course material
  • A customized online action plan includes tips and feedback on progress through the course and materials, which allows students to individualize their learning experience
  • Learning objectives reinforce the most important material
  • Video and multimedia links that appeal to students with different learning styles
  • Web Exercises and meaningful web links facilitate student use of internet resources, further exploration of topics, and responses to critical thinking questions
  • EXCLUSIVE! Access to full-text SAGE journal articles that have been carefully selected to support and expand on the concepts presented in each chapter

“This text offers comprehensive coverage of ICC while balancing theory and practical application. Students find it easy to comprehend and interesting reading. They enjoy being exposed to other cultures and ways of communicating while recognizing many cultures within the United States that require ICC skills.”

Ané Pearman
Tidewater Community College

“One of the best textbooks in intercultural communication for undergraduate students”

Mo Bahk
California State University, San Bernardino

 “I prefer this text. The book is written in a manner that is clear and easy to grasp for students of all levels. There are elements in each chapter to use as starting points for discussions, for small group work or as homework assignments. The text is formatted well and organized in an easy–to-use way.”

Aimee L. Richards
Fairmont State University
Key features

NEW TO THIS EDITION: 

  • New material on religion and identity, gender identity, and gender expression enables readers to explore the most current coverage on modern theories. 
  • Focus on Skills boxes have been expanded to include more activities that provide students with additional practice of intercultural communication skills. 
  • Focus on Technology boxes illustrate the impact of the newest communication technology on intercultural encounters. 
  • The popular map program provide students with additional context for discussion of cultures and regions across the globe and dynamic data displays that are popular with students.

KEY FEATURES:

  • Focus on Skills boxes allow for extra practice of intercultural communication by providing a number of scenarios for students to respond to and apply what they have learned.
  • Focus on Theory boxes call students’ attention to communication theories.
  • Focus on Culture boxes help students understand cultural norms and practices.
  • Global Voices feature uses brief, provocative quotes to introduce students to a diverse range of perspectives on global intercultural communication.
  • Social media is integrated throughout the book to show the impact it has on intercultural communication.
  • The author’s Intercultural Communication: A Global Reader is available to enhance content within the text.
  • Chapter-opening Learning Objectives begin each chapter to establish for students what should be learned from each chapter.
  • End-of-chapter Discussion Questions, Key Terms, and Readings help students review the material they have learned.
  • The engaging writing style makes the text easy to read and comprehend for both students and instructors.
  • SAGE edge offers a robust online environment featuring an impressive array of tools and resources for review, study, and further exploration, keeping both instructors and students on the cutting edge of teaching and learning. SAGE edge content is open access and available on demand.

For instructors

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ISBN: 9781506361659