You are here

Analyzing Crime Patterns
Share

Analyzing Crime Patterns
Frontiers of Practice


© 1999 | 200 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc

Crime control continues to be a growth industry, despite the drop in crime indicators throughout the nation. This volume shows how state-of-the-art geographic information systems (GIS) are revolutionizing urban law enforcement, with an award-winning program in New York City leading the way. Electronic "pin mapping" is used to display the incidence of crime, to stimulate effective strategies and decision making, and to evaluate the impact of recent activity applied to hotspots.

The expert information presented by 12 contributors will guide departments without such tools to understand the latest technologies and successfully employ them. Besides describing and assessing cutting-edge techniques of crime mapping, this book emphasizes:

* the organizational and intellectual contexts in which spatial analysis of crime takes place,

* the technical problems of defining, measuring, interpreting, and predicting spatial concentrations of crime,

* the common use of New York City crime data, and

* practical applications of what is known (e.g., a review of mapping and analysis software packages using the same data set).

Students, academics, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in the areas of criminal justice, corrections, geography, social problems, law and government, public administration, and public policy analysis will need to look at the interdisciplinary nature of both GIS and spatial dimensions of crime in order to

  1. comprehend the variety of different approaches
  2. address important analytic problems,
  3. reassess public facilities and resources, and
  4. prepare to respond more quickly to emerging hotspots.
 
PART ONE: INTRODUCTION: OPERATIONAL IMPERATIVES AND INTELLECTUAL CAUTIONARY TALES
Philip Canter
Using a Geographic Information System for Tactical Crime Analysis
Philip G McGuire
The NYPD COMPSTAT Process
Mapping for Analysis, Evaluation and Accountability  
Keith Harries
Filter, Fears and Photos
Speculations and Explorations in the Geography of Crime  
Charles Swartz
The Spatial Analysis of Crime
What Social Scientists Have Learned  
 
PART TWO: ANALYZING CRIME HOT SPOTS IN NEW YORK
John E Eck, Jeffrey Gersh and Charlene Taylor
Finding Crime Hot Spots through Repeat Address Mapping
Sanjoy Chakravorty and William V Pelfrey
Exploratory Data Analysis of Crime Patterns
Preliminary Findings from the Bronx  
Sara McLafferty, Doug Williamson and Philip G McGuire
Identifying Crime Hot Spots Using Kernel Smoothing
Robert H Langworthy and Eric S Jefferis
The Utility of Standard Deviation Ellipses for Evaluating Hot Spots
 
PART THREE: CRIME AND FACILITIES
Thomas Kamber, John H Mollenkopf and Timothy A Ross
Crime, Space and Place
An Analysis of Crime Patterns in Brooklyn  
Jeffrey Fagan and Garth Davies
Crime in Public Housing
Two-Way Diffusion Effects in Surrounding Neighborhoods  
Carolyn Rebecca Block and Richard Block
The Bronx and Chicago
Street Robbery in the Environs of Rapid Transit Stations  
Dennis W Roncek
Schools and Crime
 
PART FOUR: TOOLS FOR SPATIAL ANALYSIS
Victor Goldsmith et al
Evaluating Statistical Software for Analyzing Crime Patterns and Trends

Preview this book

For instructors

Review and Desk copies for this title are available digitally via VitalSource.

Request e-review copy

If you require a print review copy, please call: (800) 818-7243 ext. 6140 or email textsales@sagepub.com.

Select a Purchasing Option


Paperback
ISBN: 9780761919414
$68.00

Hardcover
ISBN: 9780761919407
$113.00

This title is also available on SAGE Knowledge, the ultimate social sciences online library. If your library doesn’t have access, ask your librarian to start a trial.