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Richard A. Zeller Bowling Green State University, Ohio, USA

Richard A. Zeller, Ph.D., 64, retired professor of statistics in the College of Nursing at Kent State University, died of malignant melanoma cancer on Thursday, April 16, at his home. Zeller retired in May 2008 but maintained his professional activity until shortly before his death. Dr. Zeller was fond of saying that he was "...in the business of jump-starting professional careers." He served on many thesis and dissertation committees, and worked with students and colleagues on the research design and statistical analysis of social and biological data. His clients were both local and international. He served as statistician on research projects in Thailand, Taiwan, Zambia, Scotland, and Ireland. He worked on research projects in hospitals and universities across America. Zeller is the author of three books and more than 90 published professional research articles. Zeller's professorial career was 40 years in length. He earned a BA degree from LaVerne College (California) and MA and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. He held professorial positions at the University of Minnesota, the State University of New York in Buffalo, and Bowling Green State University prior to his professorial position at Kent State University. Zeller's greatest professional satisfaction was assisting in improving the statistical sophistication of nursing research. The result of this activity enhanced the professionalization of the discipline of nursing. He often said that the judgment of nurses needs to be included in patient care decisions on pain management, patient constraint, diet, and a wide range of patient well-being issues for which the nurses' knowledge of patients provides valuable input.