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Inclusive Practices

Inclusive Practices

Published in Association with TASH

Editor
Andrea Ruppar University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Jennifer A. Kurth University of Kansas, USA


eISSN: 27324745 | ISSN: 27324745 Frequency: Quarterly
Inclusive Practices is a quarterly online journal published by TASH that addresses research-to-practice considerations relating to or relevant for persons with significant support needs across the lifespan. Inclusive Practices publishes articles that provide tips and strategies for practitioners, families, and self-advocates; current issues; and insights from practitioners, families, and self-advocates. Generally, each issue of Inclusive Practices will include four feature articles, one Leading Edge article, and one Perspective article.

Inclusive Practices is a practitioner-focused, research-to-practice journal designed to advance the TASH mission of equity, opportunity, and inclusion, for people with significant support needs. Significant support needs refers to 1-2% of people with extensive and pervasive support needs across domains. Historically, this group has been characterized as having “severe” disabilities. Articles in Inclusive Practices should target research-based strategies and how they may translate into practice. Topics must be of importance to practitioners working in the field of significant support needs (e.g., inclusion in the community, inclusive education, competitive integrated employment, self-advocacy, policy, integrated community living, diversity, human rights).

Editors
Andrea Ruppar University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Jennifer A. Kurth University of Kansas, USA
Editorial Board
Heather Allcock Providence College, USA
Natalie Andzik Northern Illinois University, USA
Lindsay Athamanah University of Missouri - St. Louis, USA
Elizabeth Biggs Vanderbilt University, USA
Jessica Bowman University of Minnesota, USA
Jennifer Bumble University of Kansas, USA
Meghan Burke University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Mina Chun University of Lynchburg, USA
Yun-Ching Chung Illinois State University, USA
Karen H. Douglas Radford University, USA
Charles E. Dukes Florida Atlantic University, USA
Anjali Forber-Pratt Vanderbilt University, USA
Grace L. Francis George Mason University, USA
Carli Friedman The Council on Quality and Leadership, USA
Kathleen Gee California State University, Sacramento
Jean Gonsier-Gerdin California State University, Sacramento
Amy Hanreddy California State University, Northridge
Bree Jimenez University of Texas-Arlington, USA
Michael Kendrick Michael Kendrick Consulting
Sunyoung Kim University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
Sheldon L Loman Portland State University, USA
Richard Luecking University of Maryland, USA
Helen McCabe Daemen College, USA
Meaghan McCollow California State University, East Bay, USA
Amanda Lynn Miller Wayne State University, USA
LaQuita Spivey Montgomery LS Montgomery & Associates, Inc
Amy Olson Winona State University, USA
Sheida Raley University of Kansas, USA
Carly Roberts University of Washington, USA
Jenny Root Florida State University, USA
Zach Rossetti Boston University, USA
John Schaefer Cleveland State University, USA
Sami Toews California State University, Northridge, USA
Virginia Walker University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
Kendra Williams-Diehm University of Oklahoma, USA
Jean Winsor University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA
Alison Zagona University of Kansas, USA

Authors Guidelines:

Writing for Inclusive Practices for Persons with Significant Support Needs

Manuscripts written for Inclusive Practices should focus on persons with significant support needs (i.e., individuals with significant and ongoing support needs) and include implications for research and practice that are relevant to persons with significant support needs. Although manuscripts may address a broader population that extends beyond individuals with significant support needs, there must be clear and distinguishable implications for individuals with significant support needs.

Inclusive Practices emphasizes ecological and educational validity in the content of the journal. The translation of applied research conducted in natural, inclusive settings is likely to be more relevant to our readers than research conducted in highly artificial, controlled, and segregated settings. Original research is not published in Inclusive Practices.

Journal Purpose

Inclusive Practices is a quarterly online journal published by TASH that addresses research-to-practice considerations relating to or relevant for persons with significant support needs across the lifespan. Inclusive Practices publishes articles that provide tips and strategies for practitioners, families, and self-advocates; current issues; and insights from practitioners, families, and self-advocates. Generally, each issue of Inclusive Practices will include four feature articles, one Leading Edge article, and one Perspective article.

Types of Articles Published in Inclusive Practices for Persons with Significant Support Needs

Inclusive Practices accomplishes its research-to-practice mission through publication of three types of articles:

Feature Articles

Feature articles are practitioner focused articles that are generally 18-20 pages in length, including references, tables, and figures. These articles are focused on translating recent research into practice through development of strategies or tools directly applicable to practitioners.

 

FEATURE ARTICLE

Manuscript Component

Description

Statement of Purpose

(Generally, one page or less)

The paper includes a clear statement or purpose. Authors should consider the following questions:

  • Why does this matter to a reader who is concerned around issues of equity and inclusion?
  • Why does this matter to a reader who is concerned about people with significant support needs?
  • What is the compelling issue or concern related to equity, opportunity, and inclusion for people with significant support needs that needs to be addressed with research-based strategies?

Clear Grounding in Recent Research

(Generally, one page or less)

The suggestions and strategies presented in the paper are clearly grounded in recent research. The authors can address this through consideration of the following questions:

  • Is there a succinct description of the research evidence supporting the practice?
  • Is the research evidence provided compelling in its breadth and depth? Generally, several sources of peer-reviewed, empirical research must be cited.
  • Is the cited research timely in relation to the topic? Generally, research citations are within the past 5 years.
  • Is the solution or strategy provided innovative in terms of moving the field forward? If the strategy itself is not innovative, the strategy should be applied in an innovative manner.

Implementation Guidelines

(Generally, 12-15 pages)

This section consists of the description of how to implement the strategy. The authors can address this through consideration of the following questions:

  • A detailed description of how to implement the practice or strategy with clear (jargon-free) language. Sentences should be concise and detail actions practitioners should take in order to successfully implement the strategy.
  • A detailed description of supporting materials (e.g.., tools, checklists and templates) and examples demonstrating how the strategy is implemented in a specified setting.
  • The guidance must clearly promote equity, opportunity, and inclusion for persons with significant support needs in natural settings (e.g., schools, communities)

Conclusion

(Generally, one paragraph)

A conclusion is provided, reminding readers of the purpose of the paper, why it is important, and summarizes 3-5 take-aways for implementing the strategy described. It further reiterates the inclusive, equitable nature of the strategy for people with significant support needs.

References

A list of references is provided in APA, 7th edition format. These references should be relevant and timely (preference for cited works published within the past 5 years)

Tools, Checklists, Templates

Authors provide examples of completed forms, tools, checklists, templates, or other supporting materials practitioners could immediately use to implement the strategy described.

 

Leading Edge Articles

Leading Edge articles are practitioner focused articles that are generally 5-8 pages in length that address current issues in the field affecting practitioners. These articles are research-based essays on a variety of current issues aimed at providing practitioners information on current topics relevant to their work (e.g., policy briefs, recent legal decisions, global perspectives, technology applications and innovations, intersectional considerations).

 

LEADING EDGE ARTICLE

Manuscript Component

Description

Statement of Interest

(Generally, one page or less)

The essay addresses current issues in the field affecting stakeholders, including families, self-advocates, and practitioners, whose work centers on people with significant support needs. The statement of interest makes a compelling argument related to the relevancy of the topic, including how it impacts individuals with significant support needs and the timely nature of the issue.

Identification of current or emerging issue to the field

(Generally, 4-5 pages)

The essay identifies a current issue aimed at providing practitioners with information on current issues relevant to the equity, opportunity, and inclusion of persons with significant support needs. The authors can address this through consideration of the following guidelines:

  • A description of the current or emerging issue, with relevant citations. For example, a recent court ruling, or technological breakthrough may be described. Citations are included allowing practitioners to get more information about the topic.
  • To the extent practicable, the topic is based on sound policy or research footing, and avoids promotion of fads or practices that lack empirical support.

Implications

(Generally, 1-2 pages)

Clear implications of the emerging issue or topic are presented. The implications must clearly:

  • Describe in jargon-free language why the topic is of immediate significance to practitioners and/or families and/or self-advocates
  • Promote equity, opportunity, and inclusion for people with significant support needs in a direct manner.

Conclusion

(Generally, one paragraph)

A conclusion is provided, reminding readers of the purpose of the paper, why it is important, and why it is a timely issue. It further reiterates how the topic affects the equity, opportunity, and inclusion of persons with significant support needs

References

A list of references is provided in APA, 7th edition format. Given the topic, it is likely these references will include websites.

 

Perspective Page

Perspectives Page articles are brief papers (generally 3-4 pages) providing insights from self-advocates, practitioners and/or family members (e.g., interviews, self-reflections, success stories) that are innovative and applicable to the work of practitioners. Authors interested in writing a Perspective Page are strongly encouraged to first contact the Managing Editor to determine suitability for publication.

 

PERSPECTIVE PAGE ARTICLE

Manuscript Component

Description

Introduction

(Generally 1-2 pages)

Author introduces self and describes their perspective (e.g., as a family member, as a teacher, self-advocate), or introduces a person (e.g., family member, teacher, self-advocate, researcher, administrator, or policy maker) who will be interviewed

Personal Narrative or Interview

(Generally 2-3 pages)

The personal narrative provides an overview and rationale for the narrative by considering the following questions:

  • What is the rationale for sharing their perspective?
  • How does the perspective shared broaden the views of IPX readers
  • Why are they sharing their perspective?
  • What is their perspective or experience that relates to the equity, opportunity, and inclusion for persons with significant support needs?

Conclusion

(Generally 1 paragraph)

A conclusion is provided reminding readers of the author’s perspective (e.g., as a family member, as a teacher, self-advocate), and why their perspective is important. Authors may choose to make reasonable suggestions for other stakeholders based on their perspective.

 

Manuscript Preparation

All manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with the guidelines specified in the

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 7th edition, 2019).

Format. Manuscripts should be typed, double-spaced, on 8 X 11-inch paper, with 1-inch margins, and Times New Roman 12 point font. Tables may be single or double-spaced. A separate file should be created for each of the following: a) title page, b) abstract, main document, and references, c) tables, d) figures and e) short author biographieses. Files should be saved in Microsoft Word and should not contain any author identifying information.

Pull Quotes. Authors should provide at least one possible short pull quote option. Pull quotes should be no more than 20-25 words.

Artwork. Figures must be production-ready. Rules/tick marks should not be smaller than 1 point. Use bold type that is large enough to be reduced. Acceptable electronic formats for artwork include TIFF, JPEG, PNG, EPS, PDF, PPT, Excel, and Word. Scans/photos must be at least 300 dpi. At lower resolutions these items will have a very poor print quality even if they look crisp and clear on a printout. Artwork, including photographs, are encouraged but not required.

Permissions. Written permission to reprint or adapt figures, tables, artwork, photographs, and other material from another source must be obtained prior to publication of an article. The author is responsible for obtaining permission and paying any fees assessed by the copyright holder.

Language. Reference to individuals with disabilities should conform to the General Guidelines for Reducing Bias described in the APA manual (2019). All Inclusive Practices articles will be edited to adhere to TASH policies on language, which are available from TASH Executive Offices: TASH, 2013 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20006; Phone: 202-540-9020; Email: info@tash.org

Statement of Ethics. The opinions expressed in Inclusive Practices are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the editor, editorial board, TASH Board of Directors, and the TASH Staff. Authors are encouraged to be respectful of all authors they cite or persons to whom they refer, and are advised not to reveal any personal information about these persons that is damaging or hurtful.

Manuscript Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted electronically through the online submission system, SAGE Track. Please go to https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ipx and click on “Submit a Manuscript” to find author guidelines and submission instructions. Additional guidelines or questions regarding the submission process may be directed the Editors: Andrea Ruppar and Jennifer Kurth at tashinclusivepractices@gmail.com

Peer Review Process and Editorial Decisions

Manuscripts submitted to Inclusive Practices are screened by the Managing Editor and Editor to determine a) appropriateness for the journal, b) conformation to APA guidelines, and c) adherence to page limits.

Feature articles will adhere to the following peer review process: If a manuscript meets the screening criteria, the Editor sends the manuscript out for blinded review to two to three editorial board members, each of whom is selected for their particular expertise. A guest reviewer may also be invited to review the manuscript. Once all reviews have been returned, the Editor makes a decision about the manuscript taking into consideration the feedback from the reviewers, the Editor’s own assessment of the manuscript, and the perceived importance, timeliness, and contribution of the manuscript to the field of significant support needs. Decisions include: (a) publish, (b) publish with revisions, (c) do not publish/invite revisions, and (d) do not publish. The editorial decision is communicated to the corresponding author along with a summary that supports the decision. The review process takes from 3 to 4 months. Manuscripts accepted for publication are published ahead of print on SAGE Online First.

Leading Edge and Perspective Page articles will adhere to the following peer review process: If a manuscript meets the screening criteria, the Editor sends the manuscript out for anonymous review to one Editorial Board member with expertise in the topic. Once this review has been returned, the Editor makes a decision about the manuscript taking into consideration the feedback from the reviewer, the Editor’s own assessment of the manuscript, and the perceived importance, timeliness, and contribution of the manuscript to the field of significant support needs. Decisions include: (a) publish, (b) publish with revisions, (c) do not publish/invite revisions, and (d) do not publish. The editorial decision is communicated to the corresponding author along with a summary that supports the decision. The review process takes from 3 to 4 months. Manuscripts accepted for publication are published ahead of print on SAGE Online First.

Editorial Policies

Authorship: All parties who have made a substantive contribution to the article should be listed as authors. Principal authorship, authorship order, and other publication credits should be based on the relative scientific or professional contributions of the individuals involved, regardless of their status. A student is usually listed as principal author on any multiple-authored publication that substantially derives from the student’s dissertation or thesis.

Acknowledgments: All contributors who do not meet the criteria for authorship should be listed in an Acknowledgements section. Examples of those who might be acknowledged include a person who provided purely technical help, or a department chair who provided only general support.

Funding: IPX requires all authors to acknowledge their funding in a consistent fashion under a separate heading. Please visit the Funding Acknowledgements page on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway to confirm the format of the acknowledgment text in the event of funding, or state that: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Declaration of conflicting interests: IPX encourages authors to include a declaration of any conflicting interests and recommends authors review the good practice guidelines on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway. Please include any declaration in file separate from the main text, after any acknowledgements, under the heading “Conflicts of Interest.” When making a declaration, the disclosure information must be specific and include any financial relationship that all authors of the article has with any sponsoring organization and the for-profit interests the organization represents, and with any for-profit product discussed or implied in the text of the article.

Publishing Policies

Publication ethics: SAGE is committed to upholding the integrity of the academic record. We encourage authors to refer to the Committee on Publication Ethics’ International Standards for Authors and view the Publication Ethics page on the SAGE Author Gateway. Journal policy prohibits an author from submitting the same manuscript for consideration by another journal and does not allow publication of a manuscript that has been published in whole or in part by another journal.

Prior publication: If material has been previously published, it is not generally acceptable for publication in a SAGE journal. However, there are certain circumstances where previously published material can be considered for publication. Please refer to the guidance on the SAGE Author Gateway or if in doubt, contact the editors at the address given below.

SAGE Choice
If you or your funder wish your article to be freely available online to nonsubscribers immediately upon publication (gold open access), you can opt for it to be included in SAGE Choice, subject to the payment of a publication fee. The manuscript submission and peer review procedure is unchanged. Upon acceptance of your article, you will be asked to let SAGE know directly if you are choosing SAGE Choice. To check journal eligibility and the publication fee, please visit SAGE Choice. For more information on open access options and compliance at SAGE, including self/author archiving deposits (green open access), visit SAGE Publishing Policies on our Journal Author Gateway.

ORCID

As part of our commitment to ensuring an ethical, transparent and fair peer review process SAGE is a supporting member of ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID. ORCID provides a unique and persistent digital identifier that distinguishes researchers from every other researcher, even those who share the same name, and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between researchers and their professional activities, ensuring that their work is recognized.

The collection of ORCID iDs from corresponding authors is now part of the submission process of this journal. If you already have an ORCID iD you will be asked to associate that to your submission during the online submission process. We also strongly encourage all co-authors to link their ORCID ID to their accounts in our online peer review platforms. It takes seconds to do: click the link when prompted, sign into your ORCID account and our systems are automatically updated. Your ORCID iD will become part of your accepted publication’s metadata, making your work attributable to you and only you. Your ORCID iD is published with your article so that fellow researchers reading your work can link to your ORCID profile and from there link to your other publications.

If you do not already have an ORCID iD please follow this link to create one or visit our ORCID homepage to learn more.

For more information, please refer to the SAGE Manuscript Submission Guidelines.

 

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