Critical Social Policy
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Critical Social Policy

2016 Impact Factor: 1.294
2016 Ranking: 32/96 in Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary | 19/41 in Social Issues
Source: 2016 Journal Citation Reports® (Clarivate Analytics, 2017)
A Journal of Theory and Practice in Social Welfare

eISSN: 1461703X | ISSN: 02610183 | Current volume: 37 | Current issue: 2 Frequency: Quarterly

· Welcomes contributions from activists, advocates, academics, practitioners, policy-makers, and users of services who are engaging with perspectives on social justice.

· Intervenes in social policy debates through critical approaches to social policy and welfare.

· Interrogates conventional approaches to social policy by engaging with questions of political, economic, social and cultural power, resistance and emancipation.

· Engages with questions of identity, position and power such as class, gender, ‘race’, disability, sexuality and age to counteract exclusion, subordination and domination.

· Uses a collective editorial approach to nurture and promote alternatives to more traditional academic practices.

Two types of papers may be submitted for consideration:

Articles (6,000 – 8,000 words, including references) may either report original research, or review and critically analyse aspects of social policy which are within the journal’s aims and scope. All articles are expected to be theoretically informed. Articles reporting original research must include an overview of the research methods used, including a consideration of ethical issues. Detailed specialist knowledge on the part of readers should not be assumed. Articles on social policy from all national contexts are welcome.

Articles should be emailed to David Taylor at articlescsp@gmail.com

Commentaries (4,000 words, including references) differ from longer articles in that they do not usually report original research and they must be topical, i.e. they should relate to a change in policy or be concerned with a policy which has recently been newsworthy. Commentaries may be used to offer service user or frontline practitioner perspectives on the implementation of social policies. Commentaries may also be used to challenge or debate positions adopted by authors of recently published CSP articles; where this happens the authors of the original article will normally be offered a right of reply. Commentaries from all national contexts are welcome.

Commentaries should be emailed to Rachel Fyson at: Rachel.Fyson@nottingham.ac.uk

If you are considering submitting to Critical Social Policy, please see our Guidance document for those new to publishing in the journal.

We are currently inviting expressions of interest in joining the Editorial Collective. Closing dates are June 12th 2017 and September 21st 2017, please click here for further details.

"Critical Social Policy is essential reading for anyone involved in social policy" Peter Taylor-Gooby University of Kent

"Critical Social Policy manages to combine increasing maturity with a youthful vigour, always offering a challenging perspective on current issues in social policy" Lesley Doyal University of Bristol

"Critical Social Policy provides serious analyses on contemporary social issues. Its pages are full of insights into policy, innovations in practice and theoretical developments. Besides stimulating the intellect, its articles convey a passionate commitment to the creation of a more humane society - a vision sorely needed in a monetarist world like ours." Lena Dominelli University of Sheffield

All issues of Critical Social Policy is available on SAGE Journals Online.

All other correspondence to:

Suryia Nayak

Social Work, Social Policy, Psychology & Public Health
University of Salford, Allerton Building,
Frederick Road Campus, Salford M6 6PU, England.

s.nayak@salford.ac.uk



Critical Social Policy provides a space for critical approaches to the production, development and receipt of social policy and welfare. By engaging with issues rooted in political, economic, social and cultural power the journal interrogates conventional approaches to social policy and offers alternative and critically informed perspectives. In keeping with the commitment to confronting hierarchical ways of functioning that inevitably lead to unequal power positions, Critical Social Policy operates as a collective.

From the moment of inception, Critical Social Policy has been a political project confronting orthodox and traditional approaches to social policy, welfare and the state, seeking to put people before profit. Its original aims were, and continue to be, grounded in socialist, feminist, anti-racist and radical perspectives relating to the experiences of people struggling within or against the state. The journal continues to evolve, therefore, by engaging with questions of identity, position and power such as class, gender, ‘race’, disability, sexuality and age, so as to try and counteract exclusion, subordination and domination. The journal aims to interrogate critically social policy within the context of national and global social change.

The Critical Social Policy editorial collective welcomes contributions from activists, advocates, academics, practitioners, policy-makers, and users of services who are engaging with perspectives on power, resistance, emancipation, social justice and political transformation. We also welcome debate on how to initiate, engender and support struggles within the sphere of social policy.

Editorial Collective
Alastair Christie University College Cork, Ireland
Rachael Dobson Kingston University, UK
Rachel Fyson Nottingham University, UK
Paul Michael Garrett NUI Galway, Ireland
Norman Ginsburg London Metropolitan University, UK
Chris Grover Lancaster University, UK
Olwen Hamer University of Birmingham , UK
Shona Hunter University of Leeds, UK
Syd Jeffers University of East London, UK
Suryia Nayak University of Salford, UK
Arianna Silvestri London School of Economics, UK
Sirin Sung Queen's University, UK
David Taylor University of Brighton, UK
Lizzie Ward University of Brighton, UK
Nicki Ward University of Birmingham , UK
Jay Wiggan University of Edinburgh, UK
Administrator
International Advisory Board
Donna Baines University of Sydney, Australia
Jacqueline Heinen University of Versailles, France
Barbara Hobson University of Stockholm, Sweden
Fabain Kessl University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
Liu Meng China Women's University, China
Arianna Silvestri London School of Economics, UK
Pauline Stoltz Aalborg University, Denmark
Julia Szalai Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary
Charlotte Williams RMIT University, Australia
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    1. Peer review policy
    2. Article types
    3. Authorship
    4. How to submit your manuscript
    5. Journal contributor's publishing agreement
      5.1 SAGE Choice and Open Access
    6. Statements and conventions
      6.1 Acknowledgments
      6.2 Declaration of conflicting interests
      6.3 Funding acknowledgement
      6.4 Other statements and conventions
    7. Permissions
    8. Manuscript style
      8.1 File types
      8.2 Journal style
      8.3 Reference style
      8.4 Manuscript preparation
    9. After acceptance
      9.1 Proofs
      9.2 E-Prints
      9.3 SAGE production
      9.4 OnlineFirst publication
    10. Further information

    Critical Social Policy is a highly ranked, peer reviewed journal that provides an international forum for advocacy, analysis and debate on social policy issues. It aims to develop an understanding of welfare from socialist, feminist, anti-racist and radical perspectives. Contributors should refer to the Aims and Scope on the inside front cover. This statement applies to submissions for both the Articles and Commentary & Issues sections of Critical Social Policy.) If you are considering submitting to Critical Social Policy,  please see our Advice and Information document for those new to publishing in the journal.

    Journal Aims and Principles 

    Critical Social Policy provides a space for critical approaches to the production, development and receipt of social policy and welfare. By engaging with issues rooted in political, economic, social and cultural power the journal interrogates conventional approaches to social policy and offers alternative and critically informed perspectives. In keeping with the commitment to confronting hierarchical ways of functioning that inevitably lead to unequal power positions, Critical Social Policy operates as a collective.

    From the moment of inception, Critical Social Policy has been a political project confronting orthodox and traditional approaches to social policy, welfare and the state, seeking to put people before profit. Its original aims were, and continue to be, grounded in socialist, feminist, anti-racist and radical perspectives relating to the experiences of people struggling within or against the state. The journal continues to evolve, therefore, by engaging with questions of identity, position and power such as class, gender, ‘race’, disability, sexuality and age, so as to try and counteract exclusion, subordination and domination. The journal aims to interrogate critically social policy within the context of national and global social change.

    The Critical Social Policy editorial collective welcomes contributions from activists, advocates, academics, practitioners, policy-makers, and users of services who are engaging with perspectives on power, resistance, emancipation, social justice and political transformation. We also welcome debate on how to initiate, engender and support struggles within the sphere of social policy.

    Guidelines for Themed Issues

    CSP regularly publishes themed issues on topics which contribute to the journal’s overall remit. It welcomes the submission of relevant proposals from prospective editors external to the editorial collective.

    ‘Articles’ are normally 6000 to 8000 words long and ‘commentaries’ are up to 4000 words. Prospective themed issue editor(s) should take these limits into account when planning the shape and content of a proposed themed issue. Proposals can include both articles and commentaries. A regular complete issue of the journal is around 47,000 words, but a themed section may be less than this.

    Proposals should be submitted in a Word document by email to the Articles Coordinator, Dave Taylor at articlescsp@gmail.com. It should include:

    1. an indicative title and name(s) of proposed editor(s), but not the names of authors in order to maintain anonymity.

    2. a short statement as to how the proposed themed issue relates to the aims and objectives of CSP.

    3. abstracts and word lengths for the proposed articles including an editorial introduction if appropriate.

    Proposals are reviewed by the whole Editorial Collective and decisions are made at their quarterly meetings. The Articles Coordinator will communicate decisions to prospective editor(s).

    All successful proposals are allocated to a member of the Editorial Collective to act as editorial liaison and convenor of referees. All articles in a themed issue will be subject to the same three referee review process as other articles.

    Further details on the aims and objectives of the journal, requirements for articles and the refereeing process can be found on the journal website and the inside back cover of the hard copy.

    1. Peer review policy

    It is the responsibility of the author to anonymise fully the text submitted. This includes self citations.

    All submissions to Critical Social Policy  are refereed anonymously by three members of the editorial collective. One of these is appointed the convenor for each paper and will write to the contributor with our decision. Three decisions can be made: Acceptance (which may include minor editing); Rejection; or Resubmission. Please note that resubmitted articles are refereed again and that there is no guarantee that they will be accepted for publication.

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    2. Article types

    Critical Social Policy publishes original research and reviews in areas of social policy that matches its aims and scope.

    Commentary & Issues is designed for shorter, topical pieces. Contributors should aim to comment on changes in social policy and its implementation. Detailed specialist knowledge on the part of readers should not be assumed. Contributions on policy changes in countries other than the UK are welcome.

    Members of the CSP editorial collective are happy to discuss and offer advice on ideas for papers, particularly for inexperienced and non-academic contributors.

    Two types of papers may be submitted for consideration:

    Articles (6,000 – 8,000 words, including references) may either report original research, or review and critically analyse aspects of social policy which are within the journal’s aims and scope. All articles are expected to be theoretically informed. Articles reporting original research must include an overview of the research methods used, including a consideration of ethical issues. Detailed specialist knowledge on the part of readers should not be assumed. Articles on social policy from all national contexts are welcome.
    Articles should be emailed to David Taylor at articlescsp@gmail.com

    Commentaries (4,000 words, including references) differ from longer articles in that they do not usually report original research and they must be topical, i.e. they should relate to a change in policy or be concerned with a policy which has recently been newsworthy.  Commentaries may be used to offer service user or frontline practitioner perspectives on the implementation of social policies. Commentaries may also be used to challenge or debate positions adopted by authors of recently published CSP articles; where this happens the authors of the original article will normally be offered a right of reply.  Commentaries from all national contexts are welcome.

    Commentaries should be emailed to Rachel Fyson at: Rachel.Fyson@nottingham.ac.uk

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    3. Authorship

    Papers should only be submitted for consideration once the authorization of all contributing authors has been gathered. Those submitting papers should carefully check that all those whose work contributed to the paper are acknowledged as contributing authors.

    The list of authors should include all those who can legitimately claim authorship. This is all those who:

    1. have made a substantial contribution to the concept and design, acquisition of data or analysis and interpretation of data
    2. drafted the article or revised it critically for important intellectual content
    3. approved the version to be published.

    Authors should meet the conditions of all of the points above. Each author should have participated sufficiently in the work to take public responsibility for appropriate portions of the content.

    When a large, multicentre group has conducted the work, the group should identify the individuals who accept direct responsibility for the manuscript. These individuals should fully meet the criteria for authorship.

    Acquisition of funding, collection of data, or general supervision of the research group alone does not constitute authorship, although all contributors who do not meet the criteria for authorship should be listed in the Acknowledgments section.
    Please refer to the ICMJE Authorship guidelines at http://www.icmje.org/ethical_1author.html.

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    4. How to submit your manuscript

    Before submitting your manuscript, please ensure you carefully read and adhere to all the guidelines and instructions to authors provided below. Manuscripts not conforming to these guidelines may be returned.

    All article submissions should include:
    On the first page: the full title of paper (please note that the author's name must not appear on this or any subsequent page); an abstract (100-150 words) covering the key argument(s) and conclusion(s) of the paper; up to five key words, arranged alphabetically, not including any of the words in the title.

    All submissions must also include a covering letter

    1. confirming the word count, including endnotes and references; that the text has been fully anonymised; and that the article is not being considered for publication in any other context or format.
    2. giving the full name and affiliation of each author; the corresponding author’s postal and email address; short biographies (50-100 words) of each author including affiliation and details if appropriate of up to two recent publications. Authors originating from the UK should specify whether they are from England, N. Ireland, Scotland or Wales.

    Email the two documents (anonymised article; covering letter) in MS Word for Windows to ONE of the following as appropriate (see below):

    For Articles:
    articlescsp@gmail.com
    School of Social Sciences
    London Metropolitan University
    166-220 Holloway Road
    London N7 8DB
    England

    For Commentary and Issues:

    Rachel Fyson: rachel.fyson@nottingham.ac.uk
    Sociology & Social Policy Department
    University of Nottingham
    Nottingham NG7 2RD
    England

    The maximum length for articles should be 8000 words, and for Commentary and Issues 4000 words, including endnotes and references. Articles that significantly exceed these limits may be returned to the contributor for editing before being considered. The typescript should be carefully checked for errors before it is submitted for publication. Authors are responsible for the accuracy of quotations, for supplying complete and correct references, and for obtaining permission where needed to cite another person's material. Articles are expected to be accessible and jargon-free. Texts should be submitted in UK English.

    Lengthy quotations of more than 40 words should be indented; shorter quotes should be retained within the body of the text. Authors are responsible for obtaining permission from copyright holders for reproducing any illustrations, tables, figures or lengthy quotations previously published elsewhere. Tables and Figures should be presented on separate sheets of paper at the end of the article. Their position within the text should be clearly indicated.

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    5. Journal contributor’s publishing agreement   

    Before publication SAGE requires the author as the rights holder to sign a Journal Contributor’s Publishing Agreement. SAGE’s Journal Contributor’s Publishing Agreement is an exclusive licence agreement which means that the author retains copyright in the work but grants SAGE the sole and exclusive right and licence to publish for the full legal term of copyright. Exceptions may exist where an assignment of copyright is required or preferred by a proprietor other than SAGE. In this case copyright in the work will be assigned from the author to the society. For more information please visit our Frequently Asked Questions on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway.

    Critical Social Policy and SAGE take issues of copyright infringement, plagiarism or other breaches of best practice in publication very seriously. We seek to protect the rights of our authors and we always investigate claims of plagiarism or misuse of articles published in the Journal. Equally, we seek to protect the reputation of the Journal against malpractice.  Submitted articles may be checked with duplication-checking software. Where an article is found to have plagiarised other work or included third-party copyright material without permission or with insufficient acknowledgement, or where the authorship of the article is contested, we reserve the right to take action including, but not limited to: publishing an erratum or corrigendum (correction); retracting the article (removing it from the journal); taking up the matter with the head of department or dean of the author's institution and/or relevant academic bodies or societies; banning the author from publication in the journal or all SAGE journals, or appropriate legal action.

    5.1 SAGE Choice and Open Access

    For more information on open access options and compliance at SAGE, including self author archiving deposits (green open access) visit SAGE Publishing Policies on our Journal Author Gateway.

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    6. Statements and conventions

    6.1. Acknowledgements

    Any acknowledgements should appear first at the end of your article prior to your Declaration of Conflicting Interests (if applicable), any notes and your References.

    All contributors who do not meet the criteria for authorship should be listed in an ‘Acknowledgements’ section. Examples of those who might be acknowledged include a person who provided purely technical help, writing assistance, or a department chair who provided only general support. Authors should disclose whether they had any writing assistance and identify the entity that paid for this assistance.

    6.2 Declaration of conflicting interests

    Within your Journal Contributor’s Publishing Agreement you will be required to make a certification with respect to a declaration of conflicting interests. Critical Social Policy does not require a declaration of conflicting interests but recommends you review the good practice guidelines on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway.

    6.3 Funding Acknowledgement

    To comply with the guidance for Research Funders, Authors and Publishers issued by the Research Information Network (RIN), Critical Social Policy additionally requires all Authors to acknowledge their funding in a consistent fashion under a separate heading. Please visit Funding Acknowledgements on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway to confirm the format of the acknowledgment text in the event of funding or state in your acknowledgments that: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. 

    6.4 Other statements and conventions

    Non applicable.

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    7. Permissions

    Authors are responsible for obtaining permission from copyright holders for reproducing any illustrations, tables, figures or lengthy quotations previously published elsewhere. For further information including guidance on fair dealing for criticism and review, please visit our Frequently Asked Questions on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway.

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    8. Manuscript style

    8.1 File types

    Only electronic files conforming to the journal's guidelines will be accepted. Please submit MS Word for Windows format files only. 

    8.2 Journal Style

    Critical Social Policy conforms to the SAGE house style. Click here to review guidelines on SAGE UK House Style.

    8.3 Reference Style

    Critical Social Policy adheres to the SAGE Harvard reference style. Click here to review the guidelines on SAGE Harvard to ensure your manuscript conforms to this reference style.

    For citing and referencing use the Harvard-style system. References in the text should read as Hall (1995: 63-4), or Hall and Smith (1993, 1998). Use 'et al.' when citing a work by more than two authors, e.g. Hall et al. (1997). The letters a, b, c etc. should be used to distinguish citations of different works by the same author in the same year, e.g. Hall (1988a, b). Enclose within a single pair of parentheses a series of references, separated by semicolons, e.g. (Hall and Smith, 1993; Jones, 1985). Use also parentheses to insert any brief phrase associated with the reference, e.g. (but see Jones, 2000: 23-4). For an institutional authorship, supply the minimum citation from the beginning of the complete reference, e.g. (Department of Health, 1996: 36). The reference list should be alphabetically ordered.

    If you use EndNote to manage references, download the SAGE Harvard output style by following this link and save to the appropriate folder (normally for Windows C:\Program Files\EndNote\Styles and for Mac OS X Harddrive:Applications:EndNote:Styles). Once you’ve done this, open EndNote and choose “Select Another Style...” from the dropdown menu in the menu bar; locate and choose this new style from the following screen.

    8.4 Manuscript Preparation

    The text should be double-spaced throughout and with a minimum of 2.5cm margins all around. Text should be standard 12 point.

    8.4.1 Your Title, Keywords and Abstracts: Helping readers find your article online

    The title, keywords and abstract are key to ensuring readers find your article online through online search engines such as Google. Please refer to the information and guidance on how best to title your article, write your abstract and select your keywords by visiting SAGE’s Journal Author Gateway Guidelines on How to Help Readers Find Your Article Online.

    8.4.2 Corresponding Author Contact details

    Provide full contact details for the corresponding author including email, mailing address and telephone numbers. Academic affiliations are required for all co-authors. These details should be presented separately to the main text of the article to facilitate anonymous peer review.

    8.4.3 Guidelines for submitting artwork, figures and other graphics

    For guidance on the preparation of illustrations, pictures and graphs in electronic format, please visit SAGE’s Manuscript Submission Guidelines.

    Figures supplied in colour will appear in colour online regardless of whether or not these illustrations are reproduced in colour in the printed version. For specifically requested colour reproduction in print, you will receive information regarding the costs from SAGE after receipt of your accepted article.

    8.4.4 Guidelines for submitting supplemental files

    Critical Social Policy does not currently accept supplemental files.

    8.4.5 English Language Editing services

    Non-English speaking authors who would like to refine their use of language in their manuscripts might consider using a professional editing service. Visit English Language Editing Services on our Journal Author Gateway for further information.

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    9. After acceptance           

    9.1 Proofs

    We will email a PDF of the proofs to the corresponding author for checking and correction. Proofs should be corrected carefully; the responsibility for detecting errors lies with the author.

    9.2 E-Prints

    SAGE provides authors with access to a PDF of their final article. For further information please visit Offprints and Reprints on our Journal Author Gateway.

    9.3 SAGE Production

    At SAGE we place an extremely strong emphasis on the highest production standards possible. We attach high importance to our quality service levels in copy-editing, typesetting, printing, and online publication (http://online.sagepub.com/). We also seek to uphold excellent author relations throughout the publication process.

    We value your feedback to ensure we continue to improve our author service levels. On publication all corresponding authors will receive a brief survey questionnaire on your experience of publishing in Critical Social Policy with SAGE.

    9.4 OnlineFirst Publication

    A large number of journals benefit from OnlineFirst, a feature offered through SAGE’s electronic journal platform, SAGE Journals Online. It allows final revision articles (completed articles in queue for assignment to an upcoming issue) to be hosted online prior to their inclusion in a final print and online journal issue which significantly reduces the lead time between submission and publication. For more information please visit our OnlineFirst Fact Sheet.

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    10. Further information

    Any correspondence, queries or requests for information  should be sent to:

    Suryia Nayak

    Social Work, Social Policy, Psychology & Public Health
    University of Salford, Allerton Building,
    Frederick Road Campus, Salford M6 6PU, England.

    s.nayak@salford.ac.uk

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