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History and Sociology of South Asia

History and Sociology of South Asia


Editor
Velayutham Saravanan Professor and Director, Centre for Jawaharlal Nehru Studies, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India


eISSN: 22495312 | ISSN: 22308075 | Current volume: 13 | Current issue: 1 Frequency: Bi-annually
Call for Papers

History and Sociology of South Asia provides a forum for scholarly interrogations of significant moments in the transformation of the social, economic and political fabric of South Asian societies. Thus the journal advisedly presents an interdisciplinary space in which contemporary ideas compete, and critiques of existing perspectives are encouraged. The interdisciplinary focus of the journal enables it to incorporate diverse areas of research, including political economy, social ecology, and issues of minority rights, gender, and the role of law in development.

History and Sociology of South Asia also promotes dialogue on socio-political problems, from which academicians as well as activists and advocacy groups can benefit. To this end, apart from scholarly articles, the journal can accommodate sections titled 'Perspective' and 'Commentary', comprising peer reviewed academic or non-academic polemical essays and short commentaries on current issues. A third section would include occasional reports of conferences from academic and research institutions. The final section incorporates book reviews, whose scope is designed to reflect the interdisciplinary range of the journal.

The journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

History and Sociology of South Asia provides a forum for scholarly interrogations of significant moments in the transformation of the social, economic and political fabric of South Asian societies. Thus the journal advisedly presents an interdisciplinary space in which contemporary ideas compete, and critiques of existing perspectives are encouraged. The interdisciplinary focus of the journal enables it to incorporate diverse areas of research, including political economy, social ecology, and issues of minority rights, gender, and the role of law in development.

History and Sociology of South Asia also promotes dialogue on socio-political problems, from which academicians as well as activists and advocacy groups can benefit. To this end, apart from scholarly articles, the journal can accommodate sections titled 'Perspective' and 'Commentary', comprising peer reviewed academic or non-academic polemical essays and short commentaries on current issues. A third section would include occasional reports of conferences from academic and research institutions. The final section incorporates book reviews, whose scope is designed to reflect the interdisciplinary range of the journal.

Editorial Board
Akeel Bilgrami Department of Philosophy, Columbia University, City of New York, USA
Satish Deshpande Department of Sociology, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi, India
Ayesha Jalal Department of History, Tufts University, Medford, USA
Tanika Sarkar Formerly at the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Editorial Advisory Board
Maitrayee Chaudhuri Centre for the Study of Social Systems, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Amar Farooqui Department of History, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
Gurpreet Mahajan Jawaharlal Nehru University, India
Pulin B Nayak Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
Sujata Patel Department of Sociology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India
Jacques Pouchepadass Emeritus Senior Fellow, Centre d`études de l`Inde et de l`Asie du sud, Paris, France
Majid Siddiqi Formerly of the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
David Washbrook Trinity College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Virginius Xaxa Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Guwahati, India
  • Bibliography of Asian Studies (BAS)
  • DeepDyve
  • Dutch-KB
  • EBSCO
  • Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI)
  • Indian Citation Index (ICI)
  • J-Gate
  • OCLC
  • Portico
  • ProQuest: Sociological Abstracts
  • ProQuest: Worldwide Political Science Abstracts
  • SCOPUS
  • Notes for Contributors

    1. The journal invites contributions for all its sections. Articles (6,000–8,000 words), Perspectives and Commentaries (2,000–4,000 words), Reports (2,000–3,000 words) and Book Reviews (1,000–1,800 words) can be submitted. All submissions should be prepared using double-spacing throughout (i.e., including quotations, notes, references and any other matter).

    2. All submissions should be made electronically using Microsoft Word. Submissions should include an abstract of 120–150 words and keywords (from four to seven). Contributors’ names, affiliation(s) and complete postal and e-mail addresses, and fax and telephone numbers should be mentioned on a separate sheet. Please send submissions as attachments simultaneously to the following e-mail addresses: editorhssa@jmi.ac.in and Saravanan.jmi@gmail.com

    3. Books for review should be sent to: The Managing Editor, History and Sociology of South Asia, Centre for Jawaharlal Nehru Studies, Noam Chomsky Complex, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110 025.

    4. Submissions will be internally evaluated by the Editorial Team and, in the normal course, sent for refereeing. As we follow a double-blind system of refereeing, all references by which an author might be identified should be removed or suitably modified. A submission cannot be sent to referees if the author’s identity is indicated in any way, either in the main body of the article, or in footnotes.

    5. The Editorial Board regrets that it is not able to relay reports for articles not accepted for publication.

    6. Use British spellings rather than American (‘programme’ not ‘program’; ‘labour’ not ‘labor’). Where alternate forms exist, choose ‘ise’ spellings instead of ‘ize’.

    7. Use single quotes throughout. Double quotes should only be used within single quotes. Spellings of words in quotations should not be changed. Quotations of 45 words or more should be separated from the text and indented with a line space above and below.

    8. Use ‘twentieth century’, ‘1960s’. Spell out numbers from one to ninety-nine, 100 and above to remain in figures. However, for numbers followed by units of measurement, use only figures (3 km, 9 per cent not %).

    9. Use of italics and diacritics should be minimised, but made consistently. Avoid excessive use of italics for emphasis, but use it for book titles, journal names and foreign words.

    10. All figures, i.e., diagrams, images, photographs and tables should be provided separate from the text at the end and numbered in the order they appear in the text. Tables and figures to be indicated by number separately (see Table 1), not by placement (see Table below). Present each table and figure on a separate sheet of paper, gathering them together at the end of the article. Each figure and table should have a heading, an explanatory caption and the complete source reference.

    11. Book reviews must contain name of author/editor and book reviewed, place of publication and publisher, year of publication, number of pages and price.

    12. Notes should be consecutively numbered and placed at the foot of each page (footnotes). If a reference to some work is made in the text, a note cue should be placed at the relevant place in the text and the corresponding note should provide the full reference to that work. The complete source references for tables, figures and maps should be cited below each respective table, figure or map, under the section ‘Source’.

    13. We follow the Chicago Manual of Style in the formatting of the reference details for articles, books, essays, theses and other publications in the footnotes and the source citations for tables, figures and maps. Following is an encapsulated list of the formatting styles for some of the frequently used types of references.

    • Book:

    Salman Rushdie, The Ground beneath Her Feet (New York: Henry Holt, 1999).

    • Article from a book:

    Anne Carr and Douglas J. Schuurman, ‘Religion and Feminism: A Reformist Christian Analysis’, in Religion, Feminism, and the Family, ed. Anne Carr and Mary Stewart Van Leeuwen (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 1996), 11–32.

    • Journal:

    Philip Kitcher, ‘Essence and Perfection’, Ethics 110, no. 1 (1999): 60.

    • Unpublished material:

    Dorothy Ross, ‘The Irish-Catholic Immigrant, 1880–1900: A Study in Social Mobility’ (master’s thesis, Columbia University, n.d.), 142–55.

    • Website content:

    Evanston Public Library Board of Trustees, ‘Evanston Public Library Strategic Plan, 2000–2010: A Decade of Outreach’, Evanston Public Library, http://www.epl.org/library/strategic-plan-00.html (accessed 18 July 2002).
     

    Publication ethics

    SAGE is committed to upholding the integrity of the academic record. We encourage authors to refer to the Committee on Publication Ethics’ International Standards for Authors and view the Publication Ethics page on the SAGE Author Gateway

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