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The Medieval History Journal

The Medieval History Journal


Editors
Harbans Mukhia Formerly at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Monica Juneja Heidelberg University, Germany
Rajat Datta Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Thomas Ertl University of Vienna, Austria
Suraiya Faroqhi Istanbul Bilgi Üniversitesi, Turkey
Sally Church University of Cambridge, UK
Ranjeeta Dutta Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Prasannan Parthasarathi Boston College, Boston, USA
Kim Siebenhüner Historisches Institut der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

Other Titles in:
History

eISSN: 09730753 | ISSN: 09719458 | Current volume: 21 | Current issue: 2 Frequency: Bi-annually
Medieval History Journal was launched at the turn of the twenty-first century when the world of history was in a ferment, radically seeking a redefinition of the discipline. The MHJ derives its distinctive profile from encompassing the entire medieval world in scope and its multi-disciplinary foci. For the MHJ, `Medieval History` signifies open chronological and thematic boundaries to honour historical plurality. Its frequent special issues investigating a particular theme across regions have provided a space for comparative and transcultural conversations within scholarship.

This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

The Medieval History Journal was launched at the turn of the twenty-first century when the world of history was in a ferment, radically seeking a redefinition of the discipline. The MHJ is a peer reviewed journal and derives its distinctive profile from encompassing the entire medieval world in scope and its multi-disciplinary foci. For the MHJ, `Medieval History` signifies open chronological and thematic boundaries to honour historical plurality. Its frequent special issues investigating a particular theme across regions have provided a space for comparative and transcultural conversations within scholarship.

Advisory Editorial Board
Aziz Al-Azmeh Central European University, Budapest, Hungary
Maurice Aymard Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France
Carlos Barros University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostella, Chile
Richard M Eaton University of Arizona, Tuscon, USA
Alisa Ginio Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Carlo Ginzburg Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa and University of California, Los Angeles, USA
Sumit Guha Rutgers University, USA
Irfan Habib Aligarh Muslim University, India
Chun-Chieh Huang National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Gabor Klaniczay Central European University, Budapest, Hungary
Christiane Klapisch-Zuber Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France
Gabrielle Spiegel Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA
Peer de Vries University of Vienna, Austria
Caroline Walker Bynum Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ, USA
Wang Zhenping Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • CCC
  • Clarivate Analytics: Arts & Humanities Citation Index (AHCI)
  • DeepDyve
  • Dutch-KB
  • EBSCO
  • Indian Citation Index (ICI)
  • J-Gate
  • OCLC
  • Ohio
  • Portico
  • ProQuest: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
  • SCOPUS
  • The Medieval History Journal is hosted on SAGE Track System, a web based online submission and peer review system. Please read the Manuscript Submission guidelines below, and then visit https://peerreview.sagepub.com/mhj to login and submit your article online.

    The Medieval History Journal is published by SAGE Publications, Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC. In a year, two issues of this journal are published: in April and October.

    Publication Ethics:

    SAGE is committed to upholding the integrity of the academic record. We encourage authors to refer to the Committee on Publication Ethics’ International Standards for Authors and view the Publication Ethics page on the SAGE Author Gateway

    The following are the prerequisites of any manuscript submitted to the Medieval History Journal that should be taken into consideration by our contributors:

    Manuscript Requirements:

    1. All manuscripts submitted to the MHJ should contain original research based largely on primary sources.
    2. They should not be under consideration of any other publication at the time of submission.
    3. A soft copy in the MS-Word format as well as in the PDF file if it contains diacritical marks or passages in non-European languages, should be sent to https://peerreview.sagepub.com/MHJ. Create an account/log in to submit your manuscript.
    4.  The text of the contributions should normally be limited to 10,000 words.
    5. Manuscripts should be divided into three parts:
      a. Cover page
      b. Body matter and
      c. Back matter (references)

    Cover Page:

    The cover page should carry the following:

    1. The title of the article
    2.  The author(s) name(s)
    3.  All authors should be assigned superscript symbols (*, **, ***, ****)
    4.  Authors’ institutional affiliations, postal and E-mail addresses, and phone and fax numbers
    5. Authors’ affiliations should appear at the foot of the page with the corresponding superscript symbols assigned to them
    6. An abstract not exceeding the word limit of 200; the body of the abstract should be in italics
    7. Acknowledgements are also placed on the cover page

    Body Matter:

    Headings:

    1. All headings should be in Title Case, bold and centre aligned.
    2.  Subheadings should be introduced as and when they facilitate the comprehensibility of the article’s argument.
      The number of subsections should not exceed 3 or 4, depending on the length of the article.
      No headings should be numbered or be very lengthy.

    Spelling:

    British spelling with ‘-ise’ end. For example, recognise, analysing, modelling, neighbour, etc.

    Footnotes:

    In the footnotes, all sources, primary and secondary, published or unpublished, should be referred to in an abbreviated form, followed by a colon and the precise page reference, if applicable. Short titles should be capable of standing alone (e.g., Al-Azmeh, Muslim Kingship or Smits, ‘Poets in Their Place’).

    Quotations:

    Use single quotation marks, reserving double quotation marks for quoted words within a quotation. Spellings of words in quotation should not be changed. No quotation marks are required around longer passages (i.e., 45 words or more) broken off from the text.

    Italics:

    Avoid excessive italics for emphasis, but use them for book titles and foreign words, unless particular terms occur so frequently that they are better in upright (roman) type. Proper names in a foreign language should always be in roman. We also prefer to set common terms such as 'status quo', 'a priori' and 'et al.' in roman; ibid., however, will be in italics.

    Hyphenation:

    Please pay attention to consistency in the hyphenation of words. Do not alternate, for example, between 'macro-economic' and 'macroeconomic', 'decision making' and 'decision-making'. (A distinction is, however, often made between noun and attributive adjective: for example: 'the middle class' but 'middle-class ethics'.)

    Abbreviations:

    Include a final stop in abbreviations (words shortened by omitting the end), such as p., vol. and ed., but not in contractions (words shortened by omitting the middle), such as Mr, Dr, edn, eds. No stops are needed between capitals: e.g., UK, USA, MP. Short forms likely to be unfamiliar to some readers should be spelt out in full the first time they occur. Please avoid 'i.e.' and 'e.g.' in the text but use them in notes if you wish. If few in number, list abbreviations early in the notes. Alternatively, they can be introduced at first use: e.g., Oriental and India Office Collections, British Library (hereafter OIOC) or Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris (hereafter BN).

    Primary Source Citations:

    Must include the archival location, including the town and, if necessary, the country where an archive is located, at first use. Each major series within an archive should have a separate abbreviation. For official sources mention department, branch, file number, year and month in this order. In case materials are in a private collection, the name and location of the collection should be mentioned. In case recorded oral materials stored in audio archives are being used, the location of the recordings should be specified. In other cases, the name and location of the oral informant should be clearly stated if possible. Similar guidelines apply for citations of art works housed in museums or other collections, with the exception of private collections, where the owner wishes to remain unnamed.

    Artworks and Illustrations:

    Artworks given to the journal should be of sufficient quality to be reproduced in the journal. They must be provided separately in JPEG/TIFF format with minimum 300 dpi and 1500 pixels. If the artworks you are providing are larger than the print area of the journal, please ensure that all details and text in the artworks are sufficiently large so that they remain legible when reduced to the actual size of the journal. Further, it is crucial that all text in the artworks corresponds to the text of the article in spelling and style. Photographs should be black and white prints, showing sharp contrasts of light and shade.

    Captions for reproductions of art works should include title, name of artist (alternatively: anonymous, unknown artist), date (when in doubt, then as in c. 1540 or 16th century…), genre (oil painting, woodcut, photograph, etc.) and location (British Museum, London, private collection etc.)

    Please obtain permission to reproduce any figures or photographs that are not your own copyright. Similarly, permission may be required for quotations beyond the limits of 'fair dealing'. Even for photographs/images available in the public domain, it should be clearly ascertained whether or not their reproduction requires permission for purposes of publishing (which is a profit-making endeavour).

    Diacritical Marks and Accents:

    MHJ leaves the choice of the use of diacritical marks to authors, though consistency is required. Italicised words can have diacritics as well. References in European languages other than English should be checked carefully for accents.

    Numbers:

    Write numbers in figures (rather than words) for exact measurement and series of quantities including percentages. In more general description, numbers below 10 should be spelt out in words. Use thousands, millions, billions and not crores and lakhs or any other variant.

    Figures and Tables:

    Please use short and crisp titles and headings in tables and figures. The units used should be stated and the sources should be mentioned at the foot of the table. Notes relating to the table should be placed after the source. Include a mention of each figure or table in the text itself (for example ‘as shown in Figure 2’), as well as indicating placement of the figure or table (‘Fig. 2 here’). Ensure that all words, proper nouns, place names, etc., in the tables and figures are spelt in exactly the same way as they are in the text. No vertical lines should be used in tables. All tables should carry a source at the bottom. Lay out parallel tables in similar ways using similar wording. Ensure that the units of measurement are stated and check all totals or averages.

    Notes:

    • Footnotes used. Footnotes must be listed at the foot of each page and must correlate to the note cue provided in the text on that particular page.
       
    • A superscript number (not symbol) should adjoin the piece of text being referred to. The numbering of the note cues should be in the Hindu-Arabic numerals: 1, 2, 3, etc.
       
    • If a footnote cue occurs at the end of a sentence (or clause), then the footnote number is placed after the punctuation—full stop and comma. If the punctuation mark is semi-colon or colon, then the note cue should appear before the punctuation.
       
    • In the footnotes, complete details of references should not be provided. All sources, primary and secondary, published or unpublished, should be referred to in an abbreviated form, followed by a colon and the precise page reference, if applicable. Short titles should be capable of standing alone (e.g., Al-Azmeh, Muslim Kingship or Smits, ‘Poets in Their Place’).
       
    • If two or more references are cited in a single footnote, then the references should be separated by semi-colons (e.g., Rocher, ‘“Lawyers” in Classical Hindu Law’; Mathur, Medieval Hindu Law: 201; Kane, History of Dharmashastra, vol. 3: 288–90.)
       
    • Only the surnames of the authors should be provided in the footnotes.
       
    • The details of the references are provided in the References at the end of the article.

    Back Matter

    References:

    At the end of the article, a consolidated alphabetical list of all books, articles, essays and dissertations referred to (including any cited in the tables, figures, graphs and maps) should be provided. The list should be typed in double space. In the reference list, provide full name of author/s instead of just initials, wherever applicable. In case of multiple authors, provide names of all the authors. No separate listing of primary and secondary sources is required

    • Book (One author):
      Konstan, David. 1997. Friendship in the Classical World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
       
    • Book (Two authors):
      Barnavi, Elie and Anthony Rowley. 2006. Tuez-les tous! La guerre de religion à travers l’histoire. VIIe–XXIe siècle. Paris: Tempus Perrin.
       
    • Edited book:
      Eyler, J.R. (ed.). 2010. Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations. UK: Surrey.
      Soltes, Ori Z. (ed.). 1999. Georgia: Art and Civilization through the Ages. London: Philip Wilson.
       
    • Book edited by two or more editors
      Fay, Brian, Pomper, Philip, and Vann, Richard, T. (eds). 1998. History and Theory:
      Contemporary Readings. Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell.
       
    • Book chapter:
      Eberle, Patricia J. 1987. ‘Mirror of Princes’, in Dictionary of the Middle Ages, vol. 8. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons: 434–36.
       
    • Chapter from one’s own book
      Le Goff, Jacques. 1980. ‘Merchant’s Time and Church’s Time in the Middle Ages’ in his Time, Work and Culture in the Middle Ages [English translation by Arthur Goldhammer]. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press.
       
    • Journal article:
      Mergel, Thomas. 2002. ‘Überlegungen zu einer Kulturgeschichte der Politik’, Geschichte und Gesellschaft, vol. 28(4): 574–606.[1]
       
    • Works with the same authors, same year[2]:
      Hambly, Gavin R.G. 1998a. ‘Becoming Visible: Medieval Islamic Women in Historiography and History’. In Women in the Medieval Islamic World: Power, Patronage, and Piety, edited by Gavin R.G. Hambly. New York: Palgrave MacMillan: 3–27.———. 1998b. ‘Armed Women Retainers in the Zenanas of Indo-Muslim Rulers: The Case of Bibi Fatma’. In Women in the Medieval Islamic World: Power, Patronage, and Piety, edited by Gavin R.G. Hambly. New York: Palgrave MacMillan: 469–70.
       
    • Anonymous or unknown author:
      Anonymous. 1975. Mirzanama, Br. Mus. MS. Add. 16,819, ff. 89b–95b. Translated by Aziz Ahmad as ‘The British Museum Mirzanama and the Seventeenth Century Mirza in India’, in Iran: Journal of the British Institute of Persian Studies, vol. XIII: 99–110.
       
    • Forthcoming work:
      Gould, Rebecca. Forthcoming. ‘“I Bind Myself in the Belt of Oppression”: Khaqani’s Christian Qas#ida and the Prison Poetry of Medieval Shirwan’, Journal of Persianate Studies.
       
    • Reprint editions and modern editions:
      Febvre, Lucien. 1941. ‘Comment reconstituer la vie affective d’autrefois ? La sensibilité et l’histoire’, Annales d’Histoire Sociale. Reprinted in L. Febvre, Combats pour l’histoire. Paris, 1953 [English translation by K. Folca: ‘How to Reconstitute the Emotional Life of the Past’, in Febvre, Lucien. 1973. A New Kind of History and Other Essays, edited by Peter Burke. New York: Harper & Row: 12–26].
       
    • Books in other languages:
      Ariès, Philippe. 1960. L’enfant et la vie familiale sous l’Ancien Régime. Paris : Plon, 1960 (second édition, Paris: Le Seuil, 1973). [English translation by Robert Baldick. 1962. Centuries of Childhood: A Social History of Family Life. New York: Vintage (second edition, Harmondsworth Penguin, 1973)].
       
    • Translations:
      Bernier, François. 1989. Travels in the Mogul Empire, AD 1656–1668. Translated by Irving Brock and revised by Archibald Constable. Delhi: Atlantic (First pub. 1891).
       
    • PhD/MPhil Dissertations:
      Sarma, Pranab. 2007. Archaeology of Early Settlements of the Dhansiri-Doyang Valley. Unpublished PhD Thesis: Department of Archaeology, Deccan College PG & RI, Pune.
       
    • The Medieval History Journal adheres to a rigorous double-blind reviewing policy in which the identity of both the reviewer and author are always concealed from both parties. Decisions on manuscripts will be taken as rapidly as possible. Authors should expect to have reviewers’ comments within approximately 4–6 weeks, although sometimes it might take longer. In general, Editors will seek advice from two or more expert reviewers about the content, originality, depth of primary research and presentation of submitted articles. In rare cases of articles pursuing unusual themes, Editors might request the author to suggest names and contact details of up to six possible reviewers without restricting the choice to them.
       
    • Authors will be provided with a copyright form once the contribution is accepted for publication. The submission will be considered as final only after the filled-in and signed copyright form is received. In case there are two or more authors, each one needs to sign the copyright form.

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