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Public Finance Review

Public Finance Review


eISSN: 15527530 | ISSN: 10911421 | Current volume: 49 | Current issue: 2 Frequency: Bi-monthly

Now Indexed in the Research Papers in Economics (RePEC) database. Search 2010 issue articles here.

Public Finance Review is a professional forum devoted to economic research, theory, and policy applications, focusing on a variety of allocation, distribution, and stabilization functions within the public sector economy. Economists, policy makers, political scientists, and researchers all rely on Public Finance Review, to bring them the most up-to-date information on the ever-changing issues in public economics, and to help them put policies and research into action.

Public Finance Review presents rigorous empirical and theoretical papers on public economic polices, as well as examining and critiquing their impact and consequences. The journal analyzes the nature and function of evolving governmental fiscal policies at the national, state, and local levels. Each peer-reviewed issue explores a variety of subject areas, bringing you comprehensive coverage of the public sector economy today.

Issues recently examined include social security financing, tax neutrality and social welfare, politics and deficit finance, tax credits for job creation, public education subsidies, mixed outputs of non-profit organizations,  government loan guarantees, and distributional effects of social security.

This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

Public Finance Review is a scholarly economics journal devoted to policy-oriented economic research and theory, which focuses on a variety of allocation, distribution, and stabilization functions within the public sector economy. Economists, policy makers, political scientists, and researchers all rely on Public Finance Review, to bring them the most up-to-date analysis of the ever changing public finance systems around the world and to help them put policies and research into action. Public Finance Review presents rigorous empirical and theoretical papers on public economic policies, and also examines their impacts and consequences. The journal analyzes the nature and function of evolving governmental fiscal policies at the national, state and local levels, with the goal of providing analysis that it is of interest to an international audience. Each peer-reviewed issue explores a variety of subject areas, bringing comprehensive coverage of the public-sector economy today. Issues recently examined include: social security financing, tax neutrality and social welfare, politics and deficit finance, tax credits for job creation, public education subsidies, mixed outputs of non-profit organizations, government loan guarantees, distributional effects of social security, and intergovernmental fiscal relations.

Editor
T. Scott Findley Utah State University, USA
Associate Editors
Thushyanthan Baskaran University of Siegen, Germany
Donald Bruce University of Tennessee, USA
George Bulman University of California – Santa Cruz, USA
Denvil Duncan Indiana University, USA
Johannes Emmerling RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment, Italy
Laszlo Goerke University of Trier, Germany
Andrew Hanson University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Fabian Kindermann University of Regensburg, Germany
Marie-Louise Leroux Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada
Jukka Pirttilä University of Helsinki, Finland
Niklas Potrafke University of Munich, Germany & the ifo Institute, Germany
Matthew Rablen University of Sheffield, UK
Maria Racionero Australian National University, Australia
Abhijit Ramalingam Appalachian State University, USA
Nadine Riedel Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
Sita Nataraj Slavov George Mason University, USA
Fang Yang Louisiana State University, USA
Associate Editor, Replication Studies
W. Robert Reed University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Editorial Advisory Board
James Alm Tulane University, USA
Andrew Caplin New York University, USA
James C. Cox Georgia State University, USA
Helmuth Cremer University of Toulouse, France
Hippolyte d’Albis Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne & Paris School of Economics, France
Michael P. Devereux University of Oxford, UK
Catherine Eckel Texas A&M University, USA
David N. Figlio Northwestern University, USA
Vincenzo Galasso Bocconi University, Italy
Carlos Garriga Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, USA
Volker Grossmann University of Fribourg, Switzerland
Christian Hilber London School of Economics and Political Science, UK
Ayse Imrohoroglu University of Southern California, USA
Bas Jacobs Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
Niels Johannesan University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Sagiri Kitao University of Tokyo, Japan
Wojciech Kopczuk Columbia University, USA
David Laibson Harvard University, USA
Ngo Van Long McGill University, Canada
David Merriman University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Arno Riedl Maastricht University, Netherlands
Andrew A. Samwick Dartmouth College, USA
Dan Silverman Arizona State University, USA
Joel Slemrod University of Michigan, USA
Benno Torgler Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Gustavo Ventura Arizona State University, USA
Stanley Winer Carleton University, Canada
Aaron Yelowitz University of Kentucky, USA
George Zodrow Rice University, USA
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  • 1. Submitted manuscripts should typically be 20-30 double-spaced typewritten pages, and should in no event exceed 40 pages, with appendices, endnotes, references, author biographies, tables, and figures on separate pages. Manuscripts must be in English. There is no submission fee.

    2. Submission of a manuscript will be taken to imply that the submission has only original and unpublished work that is not submitted for publication elsewhere. Submission of a manuscript implies commitment to publish in the journal. Manuscripts should not have been published elsewhere in substantially similar form or with substantially similar content. Authors in doubt about what constitutes prior publication should consult the Editor.

    3. All submissions should be made electronically at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pfr, where authors will be required to set up an online account in the SAGETRACK system powered by ScholarOne. The Main Manuscript File must be submitted in an editable format; either Word or LaTex files are acceptable. PDF is not an acceptable format.

    For general questions about PFR or the submission process, please contact Scott Findley, Editor-in-Chief at scott.findley@usu.edu.

    Accepted Manuscript Preparation

    1. Authors must submit a signed copy of JOURNAL CONTRIBUTOR PUBLISHING AGREEMENT with their accepted manuscript. Authors retain the Copyright in their Contribution.

    2. Final versions of accepted manuscripts should be double-spaced on 8.5 inch by 11 inch (22 cm by 29 cm) white paper with 1 inch (2.5 cm) margins on all sides. Authors should send an electronic version via one of the methods listed below. The Main Manuscript File must be submitted in an editable format; either Word or LaTex files are acceptable. PDF is not an acceptable format.

    3. Sections of the paper should appear in the following order: title page, abstract (including keywords and JEL classification numbers), text, appendices, endnotes (including acknowledgements), references, author biographies, tables, and figures.

    4. Title Page. The title page should include the article title, author name (s) and permanent affiliation (s), and the name, current address, email address, and telephone number of the person to whom page proofs and reprints should be sent.

    5. Abstract. The abstract should appear on a separate page, immediately following the title page. The abstract should not exceed 150 words. Immediately below the abstract on the same page should appear a list of 4-5 keywords.

    6. Text. The text of the article should begin on a new page. Each section title should be in bold letters, and should appear flush with the left margin. Subsequent subsection headings should be italicized, and should appear flush with the left margin. Figures and tables should be numbered consecutively throughout the text (1, 2, and so on). Displayed equations should be numbered consecutively throughout the text (1, 2, and so on); equation numbers should appear flush with the right margin and in parentheses. Type mathematical expressions exactly as they should appear in print, using the appropriate typeface style: variables should be in italic type, and matrices and vectors should be in boldface type.

    7. Appendices. Appendices should be titled and should immediately follow the text. Appendices should be numbered in Arabic numerals (1, 2, and so on).

    8. Acknowledgements. Acknowledgements (in bold letters, appearing flush with the left margin) should be placed after the text of the article, in bold letters.

    9. Declaration of Conflicting Interests. All papers must include a “Declaration of Conflicting Interests” statement following any Acknowledgements (with the heading in bold letters, appearing flush with the left margin). If there are no conflicting interests, then the following statement should be used: “The author (s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.”

    10. Funding. All papers must include a “Funding” statement following the “Declaration of Conflicting Interests” statement (with the heading in bold letters, appearing flush with the left margin).

    11. Endnotes. Endnotes should be used. They should be numbered consecutively (1, 2, and so on), and they should be designated by superscripts in the text. All endnotes should be double-spaced, and should appear beginning on a separate page immediately following “Funding” statement.

    12. References. When referring in the text to outside references, include only the last name(s) of the author(s), followed by the date of the publication in parentheses. References in the text should also be listed in chronological order (e.g., Brown 1990a, 1990b; Jones and Taylor 1995; Williams 2000). Full references should use full names (not initials), should be listed in chronological order, should be typed double-spaced, and should appear beginning on a separate page immediately following the endnotes, according to the following examples.

    • For articles:
      • Burman, Leonard E., and William Randolph. 1994. Measuring permanent responses to capital gains tax changes in panel data. The American Economic Review 84 (4): 794-809.
    • For book chapters: 
      • Auerbach, Alan J., Jadadeesh Gokhale, and Laurence J. Kotlikoff. 1991. Generational accounting: A meaningful alternative to deficit accounting. In Tax Policy and the Economy (Volume 5), David Bradford, ed., 55-110. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    • For books or monographs:

      • Cornes, Richard, and Todd Sandler. 1986. The Theory of Externalities, Public Goods and Club Goods. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

      • Slemrod, Joel, ed. 2000. Does Atlas Shrug? The Economic Consequences of Taxing the Rich. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press for the Russell Sage Foundation.

    • For working papers or unpublished manuscripts:

      • Poterba, James M., and Andrew A. Samwick. 2001. Taxation and household portfolio composition: Evidence from the 1980s and 1990s. National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper, Cambridge, MA.

    • For articles in conference proceedings:

      • Johnson, John J. 1999. Tax policy. In Proceedings of the Ninety-First Annual Conference on Taxation, 130-148. National Tax Association. Washington, D.C.

    • For websites:

    • For newspaper articles:

    • For government publications:

      • Congressional Budget Office. 2005. Taxing Capital Income: Effective Rates and Approaches to Reform. Congressional Budget Office, Washington, D.C.: Congressional Budget Office.

    13. Author biographies. A brief biography of each author should be included. For example: “Janet Brown is a professor in the Department of Economics at State University. She received her doctorate in economics from City University. Much of her research has examined the responses of individuals to changes in marginal tax rates. She has also worked on fiscal reform projects in developing countries."

    14. Tables. Tables should be titled and should be typed, each on a separate sheet, immediately following the author biographies. Notes to tables should be designated by superscripted letters (a, b, and so on) within each table and typed double-spaced on the same page as the table. Use descriptive names for variables rather than computer acronyms, and explain all abbreviations.

    15. Figures. Figures should be titled, each be on a separate page, immediately following the tables. Figures for accepted manuscripts should be submitted in electronic form. Figure legends should be typed double-spaced.

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