South Asian Survey
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South Asian Survey


President, ICSAC
Editor-in-Chief
Editor
Varun Sahni Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India

eISSN: 09730788| ISSN: 09715231|Current volume: 20 |Current issue: 2 Frequency: Bi-annually

With the gradual opening up of the world economy, the economics of South Asia are being radically reformed. This development provides a fresh impetus for enhancing regional cooperation. At the same time, the nations of South Asia are faced both with increasing internal pressures and the onslaught of transnational electronic media. Certain economies of Southeast and East Asia have out-stripped those of South Asia in a short period of time. Given this rapidly changing political and economic climate in South Asia, the major aim of South Asian Survey is to enhance an understanding of South Asia among the countries of the region and beyond.

South Asian Survey serves as a forum to share fresh thinking and to debate matters of national and regional concern to the countries of South Asia from their perspective. It carries contributions from scholars, policy makers, civil servants, diplomats and journalists. The articles provide indepth analysis with a multidimensional approach. The journal debates issues of national and regional concern primarily from the perspectives of politics, economics and international relations, and also draws upon insights from the fields of culture, history and mass communications.

This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

Electronic Access:

South Asian Survey is available electronically on SAGE Journals Online at http://sas.sagepub.com/

With the gradual opening up of the world economy, the economics of South Asia are being radically reformed. This development provides a fresh impetus for enhancing regional cooperation. At the same time, the nations of South Asia are faced both with increasing internal pressures and the onslaught of transnational electronic media. Certain economies of Southeast and East Asia have out-stripped those of South Asia in a short period of time. Given this rapidly changing political and economic climate in South Asia, the major aim of South Asian Survey is to enhance an understanding of South Asia among the countries of the region and beyond.

South Asian Survey serves as a forum to share fresh thinking and to debate matters of national and regional concern to the countries of South Asia from their perspective. It carries contributions from scholars, policy makers, civil servants, diplomats and journalists. The articles provide indepth analysis with a multidimensional approach. The journal debates issues of national and regional concern primarily from the perspectives of politics, economics and international relations, and also draws upon insights from the fields of culture, history and mass communications.

Book Review Editor
Devika Sharma University of Delhi
Editorial Board
K K Bhargava Indian Council for South Asian Cooperation, New Delhi, India
H K Dua The Tribune, Chandigarh
Eric Gonsalves Indian Council for South Asian Cooperation, New Delhi, India
Nancy Jetly Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Manoj Joshi Mail Today, New Delhi
Mahendra P Lama Sikkim University, Gangtok
S D Muni National University of Singapore
V Suryanarayan University of Madras
Charan D Wadhva Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India
Advisory Editorial Board
Lok Raj Baral Executive Chairman, Nepal Centre for Contemporary Studies, Kathmandu, Nepal
Muchkund Dubey Director, Council for Social Development, Hyderabad, India
Godfrey Gunatillake Chairman Emeritus, Marga Institute, Colombo
Hameeda Hossein Professor, Dhaka University, Dhaka
A K H Morshed Former Foreign Secretary, Dhaka
Syed Nawab Haider Naqvi Former Director, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad
V A Pai Panandikar Former Director, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi
V R Panchmukhi Former Chairman, Indian Council of Social Science Research, New Delhi
Devendra Raj Pandey Former Finance Minister; Chairman, Nepal South Asian Centre, Kathmandu
  • Bibliography of Asian Studies (BAS)
  • DeepDyve
  • Dutch-KB
  • EBSCO
  • ICI
  • J-Gate
  • OCLC
  • Ohio
  • Portico
  • Pro-Quest-RSP
  • ProQuest: International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
  • SCOPUS
  • MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

    1. All editorial correspondence and manuscripts submission should be sent by e-mail to the Editor at sas@sagepub.in

    2. South Asian Survey follows standard peer review procedures with regard to all academic articles submitted to it. This involves sending contributions out to one (or two) external referees. Anonymity of both the contributor and the referee(s) is maintained.

    3. However, we also publish some non-academic ‘policy articles’ written from a policymaking or opinion shaping perspective. These are ordinarily vetted by both the editors (I.P. Khosla, Editor-in-Chief and Varun Sahni, Editor) before a decision to publish is taken.

    4. Contributors must provide their institutional affiliations and complete postal and e-mail addresses with their articles. Whenever possible, please send us the URL of your institutional website.

    5. All articles should be typed on one side of the paper (preferably A4) and double-spaced throughout (not only the text but also displayed quotations, notes, references and any and all other matter). Please leave a margin of one inch and insert page numbers on the bottom right corner of every page.

    6. Manuscripts should be accompanied by a CD-ROM in IBM compatible for­mat, preferably in MS Word, and identical in every respect to the hard copy. Alternately, the article could be submitted as an e-mail attachment. In case both a hard copy and an electronic copy are sent, they must be identical in every particular.

    7. Articles should ideally be 5,000 to 8,000 words in length. All articles must be accompanied by an abstract of 100–150 words. Please include a list of seven (7) keywords. We do not ordinarily publish articles longer than 10,000 words.

    8. Notes should be numbered serially and presented at the end of the article. Notes must contain more than a mere reference.

    9. British spellings throughout; universal ‘s’ in ‘-ise’, ‘-isation’ words (except quotations and institutional names, where ‘-ize’, ‘-ization’ should be retained).

    10. Use single quotes throughout. Double quotes marks are used only within single quotes, to indicate a quotation within a quotation. Spellings of words in quotations should not be changed. Quotations of 45 words or more should be separated from the text and indented with one space with a line space above and below.

    11. Use ‘nineteenth century’, ‘1980s’. Spell out numbers from one to nine, 10 and above to remain in figures. However, for exact measurements use only figures (3 km, 9 per cent not %). Use thousands and millions, not lakhs and crores.

    12. Use of italics and diacriticals should be minimised, but used consistently. Non-English words should be placed in italics.

    13. Tables and figures to be indicated by number separately (see Table 1), not by placement (see Table below). Present each table and figure on a separate sheet of paper, gathering them together at the end of the article.

    14. A consolidated alphabetical list of all books, articles, essays, and theses referred to (including any referred to in the tables, graphs, and maps) should be provided. It should be typed in double-spacing and will be printed at the end of the article. All articles, books, and theses should be listed in alphabetical order of author, giving the author’s surname first followed by initials/given names. If more than one publication by the same author is listed, the items should be given in chronological order.

    15. References should be embedded in text in the anthropological style. For example: ‘(Sarkar 1987: 145)’. Citations should be first alphabetical and then chronological, for example, ‘(Ahmed 1987; Sarkar 1987; Wignaraja 1960)’. The detailed style of referencing is as follows:

    • Ali, Tariq. 1970. Pakistan: Military Rule or People’s Power. London: Trinity Press.

    • CNN (Cable News Network). 2001. ‘On the scene: Musharraf tribute at Gandhi shrine’, CNN, 15 July, accessed from http://edition.cnn.com/2001/WORLD/asiapcf/south/07/14/india.raedler/index.html
    (accessed on 11 October 2007).

    • Ganguly, Sumit. 1996. ‘Uncertain India’, Current History 95 (600), October: 145–50.

    • Harshe, Rajen. 2003. ‘Indo-Pakistan Ties’, in P.R. Chari, Sonika Gupta and Arpit Rajain (eds), Nuclear Stability in Southern Asia. New Delhi: Manohar, 45–63.

    • MEA (Ministry of External Affairs). 2004. Government of India, Ministry of External Affairs, ‘India’s System of Controls over Exports of Strategic Goods and Technology’, 1 August, accessed on 2 August 2007 from http://mea.gov.in/disarmament/01da02.htm.

    • Rice, Condoleezza. 2006. ‘Our Opportunity with India’, The Washington Post, 13 March: A15.

    UNSC (United Nations Security Council). 2004. United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) on Non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction [S/RES/1540 (2004)], adopted by the Security Council at its 4956th meeting on 28 April 2004, accessed from http://daccessdds.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N04/328/43/PDF/N0432843.pdf (accessed on 25 March 2005).

    • Waldman, Amy. 2004. ‘Indians in Deal with Pakistanis for Peace Talks’, The New York Times, 7 January, accessed from http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D05EEDE1031F934A35752C0A9629C8B6
     
    (accessed on 8 November 2007).

    • Woo, Wing Thye. 2004. ‘Serious Inadequacies of the Washington Consensus: Misunderstanding the Poor by the Brightest’, in Jan Joost Teunissen and Age Akkermar (eds), Diversity in Development: Reconsidering the Washington Consensus. The Hague: Forum on Debt and Development (FONDAD): 9–43, accessed from http://www.econ.ucdavis.edu/faculty/woo/Woo.Inadequacies%20of%20Washington%20Consensus.pdf (accessed on 17 September 2007).

    16. In case there are multiple references for an author/organisation in the same year, they should be listed in the references as below:
    Dawn. 2007a. ‘North Waziristan Militants Capture 28 Soldiers’, Dawn, 7 October, accessed from http://www.dawn.com/2007/10/07/top4.htm (accessed on 2 February 2008).
    ———. 2007b. ‘Musharraf Telephones Benazir after Deadly Blasts’, Dawn, 19 October, accessed from http://www.dawn.com/2007/10/19/rss.htm (accessed on 2 February 2008).
    ———. 2007c. ‘Benazir says Two Attackers in Deadly Homecoming Convoy’, Dawn, 19 October, accessed from http://www.dawn.com/2007/10/19/rss.htm (accessed on 2 February 2008).
    ———. 2007d. ‘US should secure Pakistan’s N-weapons: senator’, Dawn, 22 October, accessed from http://www.dawn.com/2007/10/22/top6.htm (accessed on 2 February 2008).

    17. Book reviews must contain name of author and book reviewed, place of publication and publisher, year of publication, number of pages and price:

    Zoya Hasan (Ed.), Democracy in Muslim Societies: The Asian Experience. New Delhi: SAGE Publications/Observer Research Foundation, 2007, pp. 266, Rs 550.

    18. We request all the authors to ensure that their manuscripts are formatted in conformity to these guidelines. The editorial team at South Asian Survey is small and therefore does not have the time to standardise punctuation and spelling on the author’s behalf. Manuscripts that do not conform to the style sheet will be returned to their authors for style correction prior to being sent out to referees for review. We also suggest that any confusion or doubts regarding our style guidelines could be easily cleared by consulting a recent issue of South Asian Survey.

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