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Stress Management
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Stress Management
From Basic Science to Better Practice

First Edition


October 2004 | 232 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc

Praise for Stress Management

"The author is correct in saying that the stress management field is a 'soft' one, lacking a strong theoretical foundation, and therefore lacking good studies of efficacy and long term outcome. Certainly any publication that would improve on this situation is to be welcomed. . . . Strengths are the systematic approach to the topic. The attempt to ground scientifically the issue of stress management will appeal greatly to the more discerning student of clinical psychology and applied health psychology. It will provide a sufficiently academic approach to the topic that it will find acceptance in courses on the topic."

-William R. Lovallo, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center & Director, Behavioral Sciences Laboratory, VA Medical Centers, Oklahoma City

Most of the literature on stress management describes and evaluates individual stress responses but lacks a critical view of the scientific foundation of stress. In order to truly comprehend stress management, there needs to be clear understanding on the phenomenon that is "to be managed."

Stress Management: From Basic Science to Better Practice
examines documented pathways between stress and health and develops the scientific foundations for sound interventions. The book begins with a broad review of the term 'stress' and its importance for health. The text then provides a critical examination of the elements of the stress process, extracts supporting research for a rationale of stress management and describes various stress management techniques and their effectiveness.

In Stress Management, author and renowned stress researcher Wolfgang Linden reviews the literature on intervention outcomes, noting weaknesses that include an overemphasis on individual rather than societal responsibility for stress and coping and disregard of the emerging field of positive psychology. The author concludes the text with a proposed distinction between psychotherapy and stress management, and he proposes the need for three distinguishable subtypes of stress management programs-a systematic-preventative approach; a broad-based stress vaccination and prevention type of protocol; and a reactive, problem-solving type of stress reduction intervention.

Key Features

  • Begins with a firm groundwork in defining stress and examining conceptual models of stress to set the stage for rational, science-based thinking on how to manage it
  • Introduces a unique three-step process model for stress management
  • Considers physiological and sociocultural influences on stress and health
  • Offers an objective analysis of existing literature and includes extensive personal, clinical experiences of the author to make the science of stress come alive for the reader
  • Includes coverage of positive psychology and how the creation of social support and positive emotional states can ease experiences with stress

Stress Management is an excellent textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses, such as Stress Management, Stress & Coping, Stress & Health, and Stress & Wellness, in the fields of Psychology and Health. The book is also a valuable resource for researchers and clinicians within the behavioral sciences interested in understanding and alleviating stress.


 
Preface
 
1. Stress: Definitions and Pathways to Disease
Scientific and popular definitions

 
How can stress be measured?

 
A history of models for stress and health

 
Understanding stress responsivity

 
"Take-Home Messages" that are pertinent to stress management

 
 
2. Elements of the Stress Process and Implications for Stress Management
A model of the stress process, its major components and
moderating variables

 
Stressors and stressor properties of relevance for stress management

 
Predispositions

 
Coping skills: Cognitions and behaviors

 
Buffers

 
Physiological stress response: Recovery or exhaustion

 
Implications of basic stress research for intervention protocols

 
 
3. Descriptions, Rationales, and Outcomes of Stress Management Interventions
Descriptions

 
Rationales and outcomes

 
Review of the effects of specific techniques, rationales, and outcomes

 
Stress management effects for specific populations

 
Stress management effects on specific endpoints

 
Summary of the effects of stress management

 
 
4. Now What? A Summary, Reflections, and Recommendations
Major conclusions

 
Defining stress management and questioning rationales

 
What about the needed, shared definition for stress
management?

 
Reflections on communication

 
Effective ingredients and delivery modes for stress management

 
Action plan

 
 
References
 
About the Author
 
Author Index
 
Subject Index

It is recommended for Practical Life and suits present generation

Mr Essa Ummar Sheriff
CMI, British Institute of Technology & E-commerce
June 20, 2011

Excellent book. Perfect for this course. Explains Stress, recognition etc very well.

Mrs Catherine Keller
Pre-Paramedic Studies, Inchicore College of Further Education
April 26, 2010
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Key features
  • Opens by setting firm groundwork in defining stress and describing conceptual models of stress, setting the stage for rational, science-based thinking about how to manage it. Many books on stress management neglect this step and come across as "cookbooks" of different techniques with no coherent presentation or theoretical integration.
  • Introduces a unique 3-step process model for stress management.
  • Considers both physiological and sociocultural influences on stress and health.
  • Includes coverage of positive psychology and how creation of social support and positive emotional states can serve as a buffer against exposures to stressors.

Sage College Publishing

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