The Indian Economic & Social History Review
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The Indian Economic & Social History Review

2014 Impact Factor: 0.314
2014 Ranking: 40/87 in History
Source: 2014 Journal Citation Reports ® (Thomson Reuters, 2015)

Editorial Board
G Balachandran Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, and Centre for Development Economics, Delhi. Managing Editor
Whitney cox University of Chicago
Sunil Kumar Managing Editor, Department of History, University of Delhi, India
Dilip Menon University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Tirthankar Roy London School of Economics & Political Science, UK

eISSN: 09730893| ISSN: 00194646|Current volume: 52|Current issue: 2 Frequency: Quarterly

For over 50 years, Indian Economic and Social History Review has been a meeting ground for scholars whose concerns span diverse cultural and political themes with a bearing on social and economic history.

Indian Economic and Social History Review is the foremost journal devoted to the study of the social and economic history of India, and South Asia more generally.

The journal publishes articles with a wider coverage, referring to other Asian countries but of interest to those working on Indian history. Its articles cover India's South Asian neighbours so as to provide a comparative perspective. Issues are periodically organised around a specific theme as a special number. The journal's principal features are research articles, substantial review articles and bibliographic surveys, which also cover material available in Indian languages, as a special feature.

This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

Electronic Access:

Indian Economic & Social History Review is electronically available on SAGE Journals Online at http://ier.sagepub.com

For over 50 years, The Indian Economic and Social History Review has been a meeting ground for scholars whose concerns span diverse cultural and political themes with a bearing on social and economic history.

The Indian Economic and Social History Review is the foremost journal devoted to the study of the social and economic history of India, and South Asia more generally.

The journal publishes articles with a wider coverage, referring to other Asian countries but of interest to those working on Indian history. Its articles cover India's South Asian neighbours so as to provide a comparative perspective. Issues are periodically organised around a specific theme as a special number. The journal's principal features are research articles, substantial review articles and bibliographic surveys, which also cover material available in Indian languages, as a special feature.

Editorial Assistants
Editorial Advisors
Neeladri Bhattacharya Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
Partha Chatterjee Columbia University, New York & Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Kolkata
Linda Colley Princeton University, New Jersey
Prasenjit Duara Raffles Professor of Humanities and Director, ARI, NUS, Singapore
Rosalind O`Hanlon University of Oxford
Tanika Sarkar Delhi, India
David Shulman Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Mrinalini Sinha University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
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  • Guidelines for Contributors to the Indian Economic and Social History Review

    1. MANUSCRIPTS: All articles should be submitted to the Editor, Indian Economic and Social History Review as an e-mail word.doc attachment to ieshr.editors@gmail.com. The whole script should be formatted for printing on one side of the paper (preferably A4) and doublespaced throughout (not only the text but also displayed quotations, notes, references and any other matter). The format should be unjustified, with ample margins on all sides, and a regular number of lines per page. The cover page should carry only the title of the article and the author’s name, addresses (both postal and e-mail), and phone and fax numbers. This should be followed by an abstract of 200 words on a separate page and 4–5 keywords to enhance online access.

    2. HEADINGS: Limit the levels of heading within an article to two, or at most three. If you do have a third level of heading, the text should continue on the same line. Avoid lengthy headings and do not number them. The printed style in the finished journal (bold for the highest level and italics for the lower levels) will distinguish their weighting adequately without recourse to an explicit structure such as 1, 1.1, etc.

    3. SPELLINGS: Where alternative forms exist, choose ‘-ise’ spellings instead of ‘-ize’. Thus most words with that ending (‘recognise’, ‘organise’, ‘civilise’ etc.,) will be spelt with an ‘s’. Use British spellings in all cases rather than American (hence, ‘programme’ not ‘program’, ‘labour’ not ‘labor’, and ‘centre’ not ‘center’).

    4. HYPHENATION: Please be consistent in hyphenating words. For example, do not alternate between ‘macro-economic’ and ‘macroeconomic’, ‘decisionmaking’ and ‘decision-making’. It is common however to distinguish between noun and attributive adjective: ‘the middle class’ but ‘middle-class ethics’.

    5. ITALICS: For readability, use italics sparingly. The test should be whether the average reader of this journal is likely to be familiar with the word. Thus, ‘zamindar’ need not be italicised. Avoid excessive use of italics for emphasis but use them for book and journal titles and foreign words. However, foreign terms occurring frequently are better in upright (roman) type. We also prefer to set common terms such as ‘status quo’, ‘a priori’ and ‘et al.’ in roman; ibid., however, will be in italics.

    6. CAPITALS: Use capitals sparingly and double-check the logical application of any distinctions you wish to make between specific and general use.

    7. ABBREVIATIONS: Include a final stop in abbreviations (words shortened by omitting the end), such as p., vol. and ed., but not in contractions (words shortened by omitting the middle), such as Mr, Dr, edn,

    eds, and so on. No stops are needed between capitals: e.g., CPI, INTUC, MLA. Short forms likely to be unfamiliar to some readers should be spelt out in full the first time they occur. Please avoid ‘i.e.’ and ‘e.g.’ in the text but use them in notes if you wish.

    8. NUMBERS: Write numbers in figures (rather than words) for exact measurements and series of quantities, including percentages. In more general description, numbers below 10 should be spelt out in words. Use thousands, millions, billions and not lakhs and crores. In text use ‘per cent’, in tables the symbol ‘%’. Write ‘0.8’ rather than ‘.8’, except for levels of probability. Use lower-case italics for p (probability) and n (number). Use fuller forms for numbers and dates—e.g., 1780–88, pp. 200–02, and pp. 178–84.

    9. DATES: Give specific dates in the form 22 November 1890. Decades may be referred to either as ‘the eighties’, or ‘the 1880s’. Spell out ‘the nineteenth century’, etc.

    10. QUOTATIONS: Use single quotation marks, reserving double quotation marks for quoted words within a quotation. Spellings of words in quotations should not be changed. No quotation marks are required for longer passages (i.e., 45 words or more) broken off from the text.

    11. DIACRITICAL MARKS AND ACCENTS: Diacritical marks may be used in articles on pre-modern history. Italicised words can have diacritics as required. For Arabo-Persian vocabulary, please follow F. Steingass, A Comprehensive Persian-English dictionary. For Dravidian languages, the Madras University Tamil Lexicon, or some standard equivalent, may be used. For other languages, the system used should be clearly specified early in the paper. References in European languages other than English should be checked carefully for accents. In articles on the modern period, diacritical marks should be used sparingly—the avoidance of ambiguity and not pedantry should be the rule. Where diacritical marks are not used, the word should be spelt phonetically, e.g., bhut and not bhoot (unless in a quotation where the original spelling should be used).

    12. PLACE NAMES: The spellings of place names should correspond to the usage in standard modern atlases, such as the National Atlas of India, However, the spelling of words in quotation—such as, ‘Kistna’ or ‘Krishna’—should not be changed.

    REFERENCING STYLE: Please provide a complete list of all references cited in the article, including in any tables, graphs and maps. In your bibliography, do not distinguish between primary and secondary references; they must all be included in one alphabetised list. Follow the bibliographic form mentioned below for primary and secondary references. These details will be sufficient to distinguish the primary from the secondary reference in your composite bibliography.

    · IN LISTING PRIMARY MATERIALS please mention the name of the archives, location, including the town and if necessary the country and the major series used. In case of materials in a private collection, the name and location of the collection should be mentioned. Where recorded oral materials stored in audio archives are used the location of the recordings should be specified. Please retain the original names of archives but also translate them into English, for e.g., Rigsarkivet (National Archives). Names of archives and major series should be accompanied by the abbreviations used to refer to them in the notes: e.g., Tamil Nadu State Archives (TNSA) or Board of Revenue Proceedings (BRP). In references to primary materials produced by authors with Arabic or Persian names, alphabetize according to author, but do not reconfigure their names by placing ‘last names’ first.

    · SECONDARY REFERENCES should be listed in alphabetical order of author, giving the surname first followed by initials or first name. Where more than one publication by the same author is referred to, please list them in chronological order. Newspapers and unpublished manuscripts (including working papers and research papers) should not be listed.

    A. the following examples illustrate the style to be followed:

    (a) Books:
    Masters, B. The Origins of Western Economic Dominance in the Middle East: Mercantilism and the Islamic Economy in Aleppo, 1600–1750, New York, 1988.

    (Note: Publishers’ names are not to be cited. If a book is published simultaneously at different places, one or at most two of them may be cited.)

    (b) Edited Volumes:
    Troll, C. W. ed., Muslim Shrines in India: Their Character, History and Significance, Delhi, 1989.

    (c) Articles in Journals:
    Hambly, G. ‘A Note on the Trade in Eunuchs in Mughal Bengal’, Journal of the American Oriental Society (hereafter JAOS), Vol. 94 (1), 1974, pp. 125–29.

    (d) Articles in Edited Volumes:
    Gaeftke, P. ‘Alexander and the Bengali Sufis’, in Alan W. Entwistle and Francoise Malison, eds, Studies in South Asian Devotional Literature, Research Papers, 1988–1991, New Delhi/Paris, 1994, pp. 278–84.

    14. NOTES: Should be consecutively numbered and presented at the end of the paper, not at the foot of each page (even though they will be printed as footnotes). In the notes, books, articles, theses, and official publications should be referred to in abbreviated form (i.e. using short titles), with the precise page reference if applicable. If the reference is to the whole article, or to a book in general, no pagination should be provided. If a work is cited in more than one consecutive footnote, use ‘ibid.’, unless the previous note contains more than one source. When more than one work by the same author is cited in a footnote, use ‘idem’. ‘Op. cit.’ and loc. cit.’ should not be used. Short titles should be capable of standing alone and similar titles by an individual author should be clearly distinguished. An acknowledgement or statement about the background of the article, if any, will be set as an unnumbered footnote, before the other footnotes.

    The following examples illustrate the style to be followed:

    Masters, Origins of Western Economic Dominance, pp. 200–201.
    Troll, Muslim Shrines in India.
    Hambly, ‘Eunuchs in Mughal Bengal’, p. 126.
    Gaeftke, ‘Alexander and the Bengal Sufis’.

    References in notes to ALL primary sources, including materials in private collections and recorded oral materials in audio archives, should include, at first use, the name and location of the archive, and its abbreviated form. Only the latter should be used in all subsequent citations. Each major series within an archive should also be named in full at first use and suitably abbreviated for later use. However, please ensure that terms are abbreviated identically in the notes and in the list of references at the end of the paper. The names and locations of oral informants, if any, should also be indicated as clearly as possible at first use and suitably abbreviated for later citations.

    15. FIGURES, TABLES, AND ARTWORK: Please present each figure and table on a separate sheet of paper at the end of your article. Distinguish between figures (for example, diagrams) and tables (statistical material) and number them in separate sequences, i.e., ‘Figure 8’ and ‘Table 8’.

    Please use short and crisp titles and headings in tables and figures. The units used should be stated and the sources cited at the foot of the table. Notes relating to the table should be placed after the source.

    Include a mention of each figure or table in the text itself (for example ‘as shown in Figure 1). Also please indicate in the margin where each figure or table should go (‘Fig. 2 near here’). Ensure that all words, proper nouns, place names, etc., in the tables and figures are spelt in exactly the same way as they are in the text.

    Lay out parallel tables in similar ways using similar wording. Ensure that the units of measurement are stated and check any totals or averages.

    Ensure that the spelling and style of all text in the artwork corresponds to the text of the article.

    Authors are encouraged to use artworks wherever appropriate. Please provide the best quality artwork you can. In particular, photographs should be high-resolution black and white or color prints, showing strong contrasts of light and shade. Please ensure that all photographs are in Jpeg/Tiff format with minimum 300 dpi and 1500 pixels.

    Please obtain permission to reproduce any figures or photographs that are not your own copyright. Similarly, permission may be required for quotations beyond the limits of ‘fair dealing’.

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