ILR Review
Share

ILR Review

The Journal of Work and Policy
2015 5-Year Impact Factor: 1.523
2015 Ranking: 10/26 in Industrial Relations & Labor
2016 Release of Journal Citation Reports, Source: 2015 Web of Science Data
Published in Association with Cornell University, ILR School

Editors
Rosemary Batt Cornell University
Lawrence M. Kahn Cornell University


eISSN: 2162271X | ISSN: 00197939 | Current volume: 69 | Current issue: 5 Frequency: 5 Times/Year

Aims and Scope

Our goal is to publish the best empirical research on the world of work, to advance theory, and to inform policy and practice. We welcome papers that are bold and original, novel theories, innovative research methods, and new approaches to organizational and public policy.

Important real world problems

ILR Review publishes research on important issues—globalization, capital and labor mobility, inequality, wage setting, unemployment, labor market dynamics, international migration, work organization and technology, human resource management and personnel economics, demographic and ethnic differences in labor markets, workplace conflicts, alternative forms of representation, and labor regulation.

International and comparative scope

Research by international scholars is central to the ILR Review and to our mission of advancing knowledge of the changing nature of work and employment relations. It also improves our awareness, acceptance, tolerance, and understanding of others' perspectives and challenges. Comparative institutional, organizational, and market analyses make critical contributions to the journal.

Interdisciplinary approaches

ILR Review highly values research from diverse social science perspectives including anthropology, economics, history, industrial relations, law, management, political science, psychology, and sociology. We believe that interdisciplinary debate spurs innovative research and policy development.

Diverse research methodologies

ILR Review publishes high-quality empirical work that embraces a wide range of methodologies. We feature ethnographic and qualitative approaches and theory-building, mixed methods, and formal econometric modeling.

Aims and Scope

Our goal is to publish the best empirical research on the world of work, to advance theory, and to inform policy and practice. We welcome papers that are bold and original, novel theories, innovative research methods, and new approaches to organizational and public policy.

Important real world problems

ILR Review publishes research on important issues—globalization, capital and labor mobility, inequality, wage setting, unemployment, labor market dynamics, international migration, work organization and technology, human resource management and personnel economics, demographic and ethnic differences in labor markets, workplace conflicts, alternative forms of representation, and labor regulation.

International and comparative scope

Research by international scholars is central to the ILR Review and to our mission of advancing knowledge of the changing nature of work and employment relations. It also improves our awareness, acceptance, tolerance, and understanding of others' perspectives and challenges. Comparative institutional, organizational, and market analyses make critical contributions to the journal.

Interdisciplinary approaches

ILR Review highly values research from diverse social science perspectives including anthropology, economics, history, industrial relations, law, management, political science, psychology, and sociology. We believe that interdisciplinary debate spurs innovative research and policy development.

Diverse research methodologies

ILR Review publishes high-quality empirical work that embraces a wide range of methodologies. We feature ethnographic and qualitative approaches and theory-building, mixed methods, and formal econometric modeling.

Managing Editor
Candace J. Akins Cornell University, USA
Assistant Managing Editor
Tom Rushmer Cornell University, USA
Associate Editors
Emilio Castilla Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Chinhui Juhn University of Houston, USA
Harry C. Katz Cornell University, USA
Peter J. Kuhn University of California Santa Barbara, USA
Paul Marginson University of Warwick, United Kingdom
Editorial Board
Katharine Abraham University of Maryland, USA
Mark Anner Pennsylvania State University, USA
Michel Anteby Boston University, USA
Eileen Appelbaum Center for Economic and Policy Research, USA
Iwan Barankay Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, USA
Stephen Barley Stanford University, USA
Beth Bechky New York University, USA
Peter Berg Michigan State University, USA
Matthew Bidwell Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, USA
Francine Blau Cornell University, USA
Alison Booth Australian National University & University of Essex, United Kingdom
Gerhard Bosch University Duisburg-Essen, Germany
Clair Brown University of California at Berkeley, USA
John Budd University of Minnesota, USA
Diane Burton Cornell University, USA
Peter Cappelli University of Pennsylvania, USA
Kerwin Charles University of Chicago, USA
Alexander J. Colvin Cornell University, USA
Simon Deakin University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Virginia Doellgast Cornell University, USA
Juan Dolado Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain
Tony Edwards Kings College, London, United Kingdom
Richard Freeman Harvard University, USA
Stephen Frenkel The University of New South Wales, Australia
Eli Friedman Cornell University, USA
Barry Gerhart University of Wisconsin, USA
Shannon Gleeson Cornell University, USA
Kevin Hallock Cornell University, USA
Dan Hamermesh University of Texas at Austin, USA
Tove Hammer Cornell University, USA
Barry Hirsch Georgia State University, USA
Robert Hutchens Cornell University, USA
Andrea Ichino European University Institute, Italy
Sanford Jacoby University of California Los Angeles, USA
Arne Kalleberg University of North Carolina, USA
Erin Kelly Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Thomas Kochan MIT, USA
Francis Kramarz CREST (Paris), France
Sarosh Kuruvilla Cornell University, USA
Russell Lansbury University of Sydney, Australia
C. K. Lee University of California Los Angeles, USA
David Lipsky Cornell University, USA
Mingwei Liu Rutgers University, USA
Richard Locke Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Lisa Lynch Brandeis University, USA
John Paul MacDuffie University of Pennsylvania, USA
Steve Machin University College London, UK
Alex Mas Princeton University, USA
Xin Meng Australian National University, Australia
Ruth Milkman The Graduate Center, CUNY, USA
Amalia Miller University of Virginia, USA
Gregor Murray University of Montreal, Canada
Ron Oaxaca University of Arizona, USA
Craig A. Olson University of Illinois, USA
Paul Osterman MIT Sloan School of Management, USA
Valeria Pulignano University of Leuven, Belgium
Jake Rosenfeld University of Washington, USA
Jill Rubery Manchester Business School, UK
Mari Sako University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Aaron Sojourner University of Minnesota, USA
Katherine Stone UCLA Law School, USA
Wolfgang Streeck Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, Germany
Andrea Weber University of Mannheim, Germany
Kim Weeden Cornell University, USA

Manuscript Submission

The ILR Review publishes peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary research that advances new theory, presents novel empirical work, and informs organizational and public policy on the world of work and employment. See our Aims and Scope page for more detail.

Submit manuscripts electronically through our website at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ilrr.

If you encounter any technical problems,

contact our office at ilrr@cornell.edu or 607-255-3295.

Follow the link to a more detailed

Manuscript Style Guide for Authors.

The version of the paper you upload must be purged of all information identifying you, your coauthors, and your institution(s). Prepare a separate Title Page providing us with author name, current professional title, address, telephone number, and e-mail address for each author of the manuscript, and acknowledgments. This Title Page will not be visible to reviewers. You will upload the Title Page as a separate file from your article, which is identified as the Main Document.

CONDITIONS

The ILR Review will not consider any paper under simultaneous review by any other journal or publisher. After a paper has been accepted, we require authors to complete and sign a publishing agreement. Note that although copyright remains with the Author(s) (unless the work is part of government employment), the publishing agreement grants exclusive right and license to Cornell University, School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR Review) and SAGE Publications to publish the accepted manuscript. If a manuscript contains data or theory that have appeared in print elsewhere, or have been presented at a conference, we require a footnote on the first page of the manuscript giving the complete citation to the prior publication or conference presentation. Additionally, in your cover letter (entered into the Cover Letter field during the manuscript submission), please alert us to any earlier versions published elsewhere, and be prepared to provide a copy to us, if requested. To help ensure that the original research we publish is readily testable and to provide an incentive for researchers to perform replications of important studies, the Review requires the author(s) of every empirical study accepted for publication to include a statement either offering to make the data, codebook, and computer programs used to generate the results available to other researchers, or explaining why such information cannot be furnished.

LENGTH AND FORMAT

We publish papers of variable length depending on the nature of the study, but in general, the word count for a typical paper, counting all elements—text, tables, footnotes, references, and appendix material—is approximately 10,000, and the character count (including spaces) is about 70,000. For qualitative papers, we allow a somewhat longer word count—but no more than 12,000. Some tables or appendices that do not fit within this length may be published as online supplementary material rather than as part of the article itself. Please double-space your paper and use 12-point, Times New Roman font. We prefer to receive Microsoft Word documents, formatted as .docx, .doc, or .rtf. If you work with LaTeX software, please contact us if you need assistance during the submission process. You can also refer to guidelines at http://mchelp.manuscriptcentral.com/gethelpnow/training/author/ (enter “latex” in the search field). If a submitted paper is accepted for publication, we will then need a Word document for copyediting and typesetting.

SUBMITTING YOUR PAPER

Create an account to log in to the https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ilrr website. The system will guide you through the six-step manuscript submission process, prompting you for any information that may be missing.

WHAT TO INCLUDE

Title, Author(s), Abstract, and Acknowledgments

Provide the article title, authors’ names, and abstract in the appropriate, separate fields of the webpage at the time you upload the paper. Do not include them in the body of the paper itself. Prepare a Title Page as a separate document from the paper. Include title, author name(s), acknowledgments (with exceptions noted below), and a note stating which data and programs you are willing to make available on request to interested researchers. A typical note runs as follows: “Additional results and copies of the computer programs used to generate the results presented in the paper are available from the lead author at [e-mail].” When the data used are proprietary, provide the names of agencies or persons who can guide other researchers through the procedures for accessing the data. If you created the data set yourself and wish to exploit it further before making it public, specify a date after which the data will be available. Do not include acknowledgments to the editor or referees. Also, do not include a disclaimer stating that errors, or the views expressed, are the author’s. We run a blanket statement to that effect in the front matter of every issue.

The Cover Letter field can be used to jot a note to the editors, for example, bringing to their attention the unique contribution of the paper, the timeliness of the research, or if the material has been published previously.

The Title Page and the Cover Letter are visible to the Review editors but not to the referees involved in the peer review process.

Abstract

In the Abstract field, provide an abstract of no more than 150 words. The first sentence generally describes the data, method, and purpose of your paper. Two or three other sentences state the most important findings, conclusions, and, sometimes, implications. Use only terms that will be understood by a general audience (which includes readers who have little background in statistics). Use the third-person singular or plural, depending on the number of authors of the paper. (“The authors investigate how union members in U.S. manufacturing plants affect management decisions.”)

Introduction: Opening Text

The introduction is extremely important: It either inspires or dissuades the reader to actually read the article. It should start with an observed problem, paradox, or issue that grabs the reader’s attention. It should state the problem, research question, why it is important, how you empirically investigate it, and how the paper contributes to the existing literature. It should be brief (about four to five paragraphs); free of technical econometric language; and as free as possible of in-text cites and footnotes. Put all but essential citations in the theory or literature review that follows the introduction. Use the first-person (“I” or “we” rather than “This study”). Do not present an outline or “map” of the paper, and do not anticipate findings or conclusions. Do not include a subhead titled “Introduction.”

Body of Paper

The ILR Review uses no more than three levels of headings and subheadings. Do not number the headings and subheadings. Number the pages of your article, so that text passages can easily be referenced. There should be headings, on average, every two to three pages. Avoid very long paragraphs. Use in-text parenthetical Author Date (“scientific”) citation style. Whenever the quote or fact or argument you are borrowing appears on specific pages in the source, cite those pages rather than the entire source. Tables and figures should appear at the end of the manuscript.

Conclusion

The conclusion is usually no more than two pages long. Briefly state conclusions, with reference to specific findings as necessary; recapitulate how the findings add to or differ from those of previous studies; and, if appropriate, discuss research implications or unanswered questions (but avoid a detailed description of “more research needed”). We are particularly interested in authors addressing the firm-level or public policy implications of their papers. As in the introductory paragraphs, avoid footnotes and in-text cites.

References and Footnotes

Provide full first names of authors whenever they are available, and give both volume and issue number for article entries. Limit the use of footnotes to only those that are essential. If the information is important, include it in the text. Use footnotes only for explanatory notes and citations (such as legal citations) that are not easily accommodated by the “scientific” system of citation. See the Manuscript Style Guide for Authors link above (on this Submission Guidelines page) for more detailed formatting and style information.

Tables

Use substantive but brief table titles that are accessible to readers without a background in statistics. Include headings for ALL columns (including the first, descriptive column), in plain English if possible. Use plain English, or sensible abbreviations, in row descriptions as well. Tables should be oriented and sized at no larger than 5” x 8” for portrait orientation or 8” x 5” for landscape. Use asterisks to denote statistical significance, as follows: “*Statistically significant at the .10 level; ** at the .05 level; *** at the .01 level.” Take numbers to no more than three decimal places unless finer specification is meaningful. Table footnotes should include sources, notes (keyed a, b, c, etc.) explaining cryptic or ambiguous elements, and an explanation of significance levels. We prefer that tables be compiled within Word’s Table feature, and tables must be editable (not copied into the file as a static image).

Figures

Although figures may be copied into the Word file for the initial submission process, if the paper is accepted we will need figures from the original, native software that have been saved, for example, as .eps, Excel, PowerPoint, .jpg, .tif, or .pdf.

Individual Subscription, Combined (Print & E-access)


Institutional Subscription, E-access


Institutional Subscription, Print Only


Institutional Subscription, Combined (Print & E-access)


Institutional Subscription & Backfile Lease, E-access Plus Backfile (All Online Content)


Institutional Subscription & Backfile Lease, Combined Plus Backfile (Current Volume Print & All Online Content)


Institutional Backfile Purchase, E-access (Content through 1998)


Individual, Single Print Issue


Institutional, Single Print Issue