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China Information
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China Information

2016 Impact Factor: 0.935
2016 Ranking: 15/69 in Area Studies
Source: 2016 Journal Citation Reports® (Clarivate Analytics, 2017)
A Journal on Contemporary China Studies

Editor
Tak-Wing Ngo University of Macau, Macau, China


eISSN: 1741590X | ISSN: 0920203X | Current volume: 32 | Current issue: 1 Frequency: 3 Times/Year

SAGE and China Information are delighted that the sixth recipient of the China Information Best Article prize is James Leibold, Han cybernationalism and state territorialization in the People’s Republic of China.

Read the article for free here

China Information presents timely and in-depth analyses of major developments in contemporary China and overseas Chinese communities in the areas of politics, economics, law, ecology, culture, and society, including literature and the arts. It is a refereed academic journal with an international readership indexed in SSCI and Scopus.

China Information pays special attention to views and areas that do not receive sufficient attention in the mainstream discourse on contemporary China. It encourages discussion and debate between different academic traditions, offers a platform to express controversial and dissenting opinions, and promotes research that is historically sensitive and contemporarily relevant.

The journal's mission to promote exchanges between different academic traditions is reflected in its awareness of the important contributions made by scholars outside the Anglo-Saxon world. It actively seeks to reflect the diversity of scholarships and research agendas in America, Europe, Japan, and China. The journal includes book reviews that cover publications from mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, France, and the German-speaking areas. In addition, China Information transcends the conventional boundaries between social sciences and humanities and encourages cross-fertilization between disciplines.

Visit the cutting-edge SAGE Journals platform to start reading all issues now.

China Information presents timely and in-depth analyses of major developments in contemporary China and overseas Chinese communities in the areas of politics, economics, law, ecology, culture, and society, including literature and the arts. It is refereed academic journal with an international readership indexed in SSCI and Scopus.

China Information pays special attention to views and areas that do not receive sufficient attention in the mainstream discourse on contemporary China. It encourages discussion and debate between different academic traditions, offers a platform to express controversial and dissenting opinions, and promotes research that is historically sensitive and contemporarily relevant.

Book Reviews Editors
Maukuei Chang Academia Sinica, Taiwan
Francoise Mengin CERI, Paris, France
Yukihito Sato IDE-JETRO, Japan
Suzanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik University of Vienna, Austria
Wu Yongping Tsinghua University, China
Ray Yep City University of Hong Kong, China
Editorial Board
Gregor Benton Cardiff University, UK
Jean-Pierre Cabestan Hong Kong Baptist University, China
Timothy Cheek University of British Columbia, Canada
Woei Lien Chong Leiden, Netherlands
Flemming Christiansen University Duisburg-Essen, Germany
Arif Dirlik Eugene, USA
Stephan Feuchtwang London School of Economics, UK
David Goodman Xi'an Jiaotong Liverpool University, China
Anne Sytske Keijser Leiden University, Netherlands
Stefan Landsberger University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Laurence J. C. Ma University of Akron, Ohio, USA
Colin Mackerras Griffith University, Nathan, Australia
Andrew J Nathan Columbia University, USA
Suzanne Pepper Hong Kong
Frank Pieke Leiden University, Netherlands
Anthony Saich Harvard University, USA
Harro von Senger Swiss Institute of Comparative Law, Luasanne, Switzerland
James D Seymour Columbia University, USA
Jonathan Unger Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Benjamin van Rooij University of California, Irvine, USA
Dong Wang Shanghai University, China
Christine Wong University of Melbourne, Australia
R Bin Wong University of California, USA
Guobin Yang Annenberg School for Communication & Department of Sociology, USA
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  • Please read the guidelines below then visit the Journal’s submission site https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cin to upload your manuscript. Please note that manuscripts not conforming to these guidelines may be returned.

    Only manuscripts of sufficient quality that meet the aims and scope of China Information will be reviewed.

    There are no fees payable to submit or publish in this journal.

    As part of the submission process you will be required to warrant that you are submitting your original work, that you have the rights in the work, that you are submitting the work for first publication in the Journal and that it is not being considered for publication elsewhere and has not already been published elsewhere, and that you have obtained and can supply all necessary permissions for the reproduction of any copyright works not owned by you.

    1. What do we publish?
      1.1 Aims & Scope
      1.2 Article types
      1.3 Writing your paper
    2. Editorial policies
      2.1 Peer review policy
      2.2 Authorship
      2.3 Acknowledgements
      2.4 Funding
      2.5 Declaration of conflicting interests
    3. Publishing policies
      3.1 Publication ethics
      3.2 Contributor's publishing agreement
      3.3 Open access and author archiving
    4. Preparing your manuscript
      4.1 Formatting
      4.2 Artwork, figures and other graphics
      4.3 Journal style
      4.4 Reference style
      4.5 Supplementary material
      4.6 English language editing services
    5. Submitting your manuscript
      5.1 ORCID
      5.2 Information required for completing your submission
      5.3 Permissions
    6. On acceptance and publication
      6.1 SAGE Production
      6.2 Online First publication
      6.3 Access to your published article
      6.4 Promoting your article
    7. Further information

     

    China Information is a refereed journal devoted to research and fieldwork on all aspects of contemporary China. Papers and book reviews are only considered for publication on the condition that they have not already been published, and that they are not being considered for publication elsewhere. Submission is taken to imply the author’s guarantee that the submitted work meets that condition. Articles should not normally exceed 10,000 words, including endnotes, references, and appendices, and they should be submitted through https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cin. Research papers are sent to external specialists for review, comments, and advice. Layout, punctuation, annotation, etc., should be in accordance with our house style. Further details are provided below.

    1. What do we publish?

    1.1 Aims & Scope

    Before submitting your manuscript to China Information, please ensure you have read the Aims & Scope.

    1.2 Article Types

    Full papers are generally restricted to a maximum of 10,000 words, including all elements (title page, abstract, notes, references, tables, biographical statement, etc.). Papers and book reviews are only considered for publication on the condition that they have not already been published, and that they are not being considered for publication elsewhere. Submission is taken to imply the author’s guarantee that the submitted work meets that condition. Research papers are sent to external specialists for review, comments, and advice. Layout, punctuation, annotation, etc., should be in accordance with our house style. Further details are provided below.

    1.3 Writing your paper

    The SAGE Author Gateway has some general advice and on how to get published, plus links to further resources.

    1.3.1 Make your article discoverable

    When writing up your paper, think about how you can make it discoverable. The title, keywords and abstract are key to ensuring readers find your article through search engines such as Google. For information and guidance on how best to title your article, write your abstract and select your keywords, have a look at this page on the Gateway: How to Help Readers Find Your Article Online.

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    2. Editorial policies

    2.1 Peer review policy

    China Information operates a strictly anonymous peer review process in which the reviewer’s name is withheld from the author and, the author’s name from the reviewer. When submitting an article, the author’s name, professional title or position, as well as institutional affiliation should be provided in a separate file. The author’s name should not appear on any page of the manuscript, since the editorial policy of China Information is to have submitted research papers read by independent referees on the basis of anonymity of both author and referee. The title of the article should appear at the top of the first page.

    2.2 Authorship

    All parties who have made a substantive contribution to the article should be listed as authors. Principal authorship, authorship order, and other publication credits should be based on the relative scientific or professional contributions of the individuals involved, regardless of their status. A student is usually listed as principal author on any multiple-authored publication that substantially derives from the student’s dissertation or thesis.

    2.3 Acknowledgements

    All contributors who do not meet the criteria for authorship should be listed in an Acknowledgements section. Examples of those who might be acknowledged include a person who provided purely technical help, or a department chair who provided only general support.

    Please supply any personal acknowledgements separately to the main text to facilitate anonymous peer review.

    2.3.1 Writing assistance

    Individuals who provided writing assistance, e.g. from a specialist communications company, do not qualify as authors and so should be included in the Acknowledgements section. Authors must disclose any writing assistance – including the individual’s name, company and level of input – and identify the entity that paid for this assistance. It is not necessary to disclose use of language polishing services.

    2.4 Funding

    China Information requires all authors to acknowledge their funding in a consistent fashion under a separate heading.  Please visit the Funding Acknowledgements page on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway to confirm the format of the acknowledgment text in the event of funding, or state that: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

    2.5 Declaration of conflicting interests

    China Information encourages authors to include a declaration of any conflicting interests and recommends you review the good practice guidelines on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway.

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    3. Publishing Policies

    3.1 Publication ethics

    SAGE is committed to upholding the integrity of the academic record. We encourage authors to refer to the Committee on Publication Ethics’ International Standards for Authors and view the Publication Ethics page on the SAGE Author Gateway.

    3.1.1 Plagiarism

    China Information and SAGE take issues of copyright infringement, plagiarism or other breaches of best practice in publication very seriously. We seek to protect the rights of our authors and we always investigate claims of plagiarism or misuse of published articles. Equally, we seek to protect the reputation of the journal against malpractice. Submitted articles may be checked with duplication-checking software. Where an article, for example, is found to have plagiarised other work or included third-party copyright material without permission or with insufficient acknowledgement, or where the authorship of the article is contested, we reserve the right to take action including, but not limited to: publishing an erratum or corrigendum (correction); retracting the article; taking up the matter with the head of department or dean of the author's institution and/or relevant academic bodies or societies; or taking appropriate legal action.

    3.1.2 Prior publication

    If material has been previously published it is not generally acceptable for publication in a SAGE journal. However, there are certain circumstances where previously published material can be considered for publication. Please refer to the guidance on the SAGE Author Gateway or if in doubt, contact the Editor at the address given below.

    3.2 Contributor's publishing agreement

    Before publication, SAGE requires the author as the rights holder to sign a Journal Contributor’s Publishing Agreement. SAGE’s Journal Contributor’s Publishing Agreement is an exclusive licence agreement which means that the author retains copyright in the work but grants SAGE the sole and exclusive right and licence to publish for the full legal term of copyright. Exceptions may exist where an assignment of copyright is required or preferred by a proprietor other than SAGE. In this case copyright in the work will be assigned from the author to the society. For more information please visit the SAGE Author Gateway.

    3.3 Open access and author archiving

    China Information offers optional open access publishing via the SAGE Choice programme. For more information please visit the SAGE Choice website. For information on funding body compliance, and depositing your article in repositories, please visit SAGE Publishing Policies on our Journal Author Gateway.

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    4. Preparing your manuscript for submission

    4.1 Formatting

    The preferred format for your manuscript is Word. LaTeX files are also accepted. Word and (La)Tex templates are available on the Manuscript Submission Guidelines page of our Author Gateway.

    4.2 Artwork, figures and other graphics

    For guidance on the preparation of illustrations, pictures and graphs in electronic format, please visit SAGE’s Manuscript Submission Guidelines.

    Figures supplied in colour will appear in colour online regardless of whether or not these illustrations are reproduced in colour in the printed version. For specifically requested colour reproduction in print, you will receive information regarding the costs from SAGE after receipt of your accepted article.

    4.3 Journal style

    To download a copy of the following style guidelines, please click here.

    Pages should be numbered consecutively. Avoid the following:

    • Hard page returns.
    • Different fonts, except for Times New Roman 11 pt for main text; Times New Roman 10 pt for endnotes and references.
    • Other formatting styles affecting letter size and appearance, including bold and underline.
    • Comment, highlighting, tracking features, etc.
    • Headers and footers, especially those containing the author’s name should be avoided (see point no. 1).
    • Line spacing and margin specifications should only occur ONCE, at the beginning of the document. The use of charts and tables should be kept to a minimum. Please submit all illustrations in a separate file.

    Articles approved for publication should be accompanied by an abstract of not more than 200 words as well as five to six keywords or phrases, followed by the author’s affiliation. List authors’ full names (not initials) in the order that they appear on the manuscript, with their affiliations directly following their names. A postal and email address for the first or corresponding author should also be provided. Other personal notes and acknowledgements should be placed in the notes section as the first, unnumbered note. Avoid using more than three levels of headings: use capital letters for A-heads, headline-style capitalization for B-heads, and sentence-style capitalization for C-heads.

    Use UK spelling and punctuation. Follow Oxford English Dictionary and use -ize and -yse spellings. Use a comma to separate a series of three or more words, phrases, or clauses (like this), and before a conjunction separating the last two.

    Quotations should be continuous within the text unless they exceed 40 words or if there is a special reason for separating them from the text; any quotation of more than 40 words should be indented in its entirety, with no quotation marks at the beginning or end. The text following a block quotation should not, however, be indented. When quoting verbatim, use single quotation marks to enclose quoted matter. Quotes within quotes should be placed between double quotation marks. Question marks and exclamation marks should be placed outside quotation marks unless the question or exclamation occurs within the quotation itself. Omission within a fragment is noted by three ellipsis points. Omission following a sentence is indicated by four dots. The first, placed immediately after the last word, is the period.

    One space only after full stops (periods). This paragraph is an illustration. Do not use a double space after a full stop. No space after decimal point.

    Parentheses are used throughout; square brackets are used only to enclose parenthetical material already in parentheses and to enclose an author’s comment within a quote, e.g. [sic], [emphasis added].

    Chinese characters, not pinyin, are used in the main text of the article, usually after the English translation of a phrase or term. However if a term in pinyin is mentioned several times in the text, then the pinyin term is retained. It is italicized and accompanied by Chinese characters between brackets on first mention, e.g. This article supplements the body of research about the Chinese Party discipline system through an examination of shuanggui (双规), a form of detention used on Party members. For Chinese-language sources in the notes and references, use Chinese characters for all titles followed by the English translation within parentheses and with sentence-style capitalization.

    Notes: Kang Xiaoguang 康晓光, 仁政:中国政治发展的第三条道路 (A policy based on the sense of humanity: The third way of Chinese political development), Singapore: 八方文化创作室 (Global Publishing), 2005.

    References: Kang, Xiaoguang 康晓光 (2005) 仁政:中国政治发展的第三条道路 (A policy based on the sense of humanity: The third way of Chinese political development). Singapore: 八方文化创作室 (Global Publishing).

    Place names: Beijing Municipality, not Peking municipality. Anhui Province, not Anhui province. Note also Taipei (not Taibei or Taipeh). Capital letters: Communist(s) (as member of the Communist Party); otherwise communist (in reference to ideology).

    Numbers: Spell out numbers one to nine; use figures for numerals 10 and above. Use the least number of numerals possible in pagination and dates, e.g. 42–5, 2003–4, 1989–92. But use 10–14, 10–11 as these represent single words.

    For currency, use the common symbol or abbreviation—US$, £, €, etc. For Chinese currency, use RMB.

    Anglicized words should be roman with no accents, e.g. ad hoc, vis-a-vis, naive.

    Minimize use of abbreviations; retain only the most common ones e.g., CCP, WTO, UN, PLA, US, UK, NGO. Use the full or shortened name rather than abbreviations for those that are less common or nonstandard, e.g., the State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission can be referred to as State-owned Assets Commission, not SASAC. Contractions do not take full points, e.g., Dr, Mr, St. However the following abbreviations take full points: no., Co., p., pp., vol., ch. (but use vols and chs), ed. (but use eds).

    Use the standard abbreviated form for American states (and territories), e.g. AL (for Alabama), TX (for Texas), MA (for Massachusetts).

    Write dates as follows: 30 September 2009. Use figures for centuries, e.g., a 21st-century dilemma.

    4.4 Reference style

    China Information uses endnotes. Endnotes appear at the end of the document. Proper and full citations of works referred to in a particular place in the main text should be made in the endnotes. The name of the author and the title of the work ought to be included in the first note citation to it, even if one or both have been mentioned in the text. In order to reduce the bulk of documentation, subsequent citations to sources already given in full on first mention should be shortened wherever possible. Substantive, or discursive, notes consist of explanations or amplifications of the discussion in the text. These should be used sparingly and kept as short as possible.

    Endnotes should be numbered consecutively. In the main text, the note callout number should be placed immediately after the punctuation.

    A separate list of references is also required. Please ensure that all sources cited in the endnotes are included in the references. Please note that the style of citation for endnotes and references differs. In the notes, present the names of authors as they appear in publications e.g. M. M. Bakhtin, Suisheng Zhao, and LiYaqing. In the references, the entry begins with the family name, followed by a comma, then the given name and the year of publication between parentheses. Follow this order for all authors and editors. Specific page references may be mentioned in the notes. The following are examples of how sources are cited in endnotes and references (note: no quotation marks for titles of journal and newspaper articles, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers):

    4.4.1 One author/editor as “author”:

    Notes:

    Minxin Pei, China’s Trapped Transition: The Limits of Developmental Autocracy, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006, 20.

    Chen Xingliang 陈兴良 (ed.), 中国刑事司法解释检讨 (Examining Chinese judicial interpretation of criminal legislation), Beijing: 中国检察出版社 (China Procuratorate Press), 2003.

    References:

    Pei, Minxin (2006) China’s Trapped Transition: The Limits of Developmental Autocracy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Chen, Xingliang 陈兴良 (ed.) (2003) 中国刑事司法解释检讨 (Examining Chinese judicial interpretation of criminal legislation). Beijing: 中国检察出版社 (China Procuratorate Press).

    4.4.2 Two authors/editors as “authors” etc.:

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Economy and Michel Oksenberg, China Joins the World: Progress and Prospects, New York: Council on Foreign Relations, 1999.

    Kenneth Lieberthal and David M. Lampton (eds), Bureaucracy, Politics and Decision-Making in Post-Mao China, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992.

    References:

    Economy, Elizabeth and Oksenberg, Michel (1999) China Joins the World: Progress and Prospects. New York: Council on Foreign Relations.

    Lieberthal, Kenneth and Lampton, David M. (eds) (1992) Bureaucracy, Politics and Decision-Making in Post-Mao China. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    4.4.3 Chapter in book:

    Specific page references may be provided in the note entries, while the full page range of the specific chapter should be given in the references.

    Notes:

    Dali L. Yang, Rationalizing the Chinese state: The political economy of government reform, in Bruce J. Dickson and Chien-Min Chao (eds) Remaking the Chinese State, London: Routledge, 2000, 22.

    References:

    Yang, Dali L. (2000) Rationalizing the Chinese state: The political economy of government reform. In: Dickson, Bruce J. and Chao, Chien-Min (eds) Remaking the Chinese State. London: Routledge, 19–45.

    4.4.4 Article in journal:

    Use sentence-style capitalization for the title of article. The name of the journal is italicized. Quotes within article titles should be between single quotation marks. Chinese article titles are not italicized. Translations of journals and article titles are given within parentheses; use sentence-style capitalization in the translation. Specific page reference may be provided in the notes, but a full page range is required in the references:

    Notes:

    Kang Xiaoguang 康晓光 and Han Heng 韩恒, 分类控制:当前中国大陆国家与社会关系研究 (Graduated controls: Research on state–society relations in contemporary mainland China, 开放时代 (Open times), no. 2, 2008: 30–41.

    Scott Kennedy, China’s porous protectionism: The changing political economy of trade policy, Political Science Quarterly 120(3), 2005: 407–32.

    References:

    Kang, Xiaoguang 康晓光 and Han, Heng 韩恒 (2008) 分类控制:当前中国大陆国家与社会关系研究 (Graduated controls: Research on state–society relations in contemporary mainland China. 开放时代 (Open times), no. 2: 30–41.

    Kennedy, Scott (2005) China’s porous protectionism: The changing political economy of trade policy. Political Science Quarterly 120(3): 407–32.

    4.4.5 Author’s work translated or edited by another:

    Notes:

    Su Xiaokang and Wang Luxiang, Deathsong of the River: A Reader’s Guide to the Chinese TV Series He Shang, trans. Richard W. Bodman and Pin P. Wan, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1991.

    References:

    Su, Xiaokang and Wang, Luxiang (1991) Deathsong of the River: A Reader’s Guide to the Chinese TV Series He Shang. Trans. Bodman, Richard W. and Wan, Pin P. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

    4.4.6 PhD

    Notes:

    Alessandra Aresu, Healthy in body and mind: Sex education in contemporary urban China (PhD diss., University of Westminster, 2006).

    References:

    Aresu, Alessandra (2006) Healthy in body and mind: Sex education in contemporary urban China. PhD diss., University of Westminster.

    4.4.7 Paper presented at conference:

    Notes:

    Edward Friedman, The peasantry, village elections, and stable modernization (paper presented at International Symposium on Villager Self-government, Beijing, September 2001).

    References:

    Friedman, Edward (2001) The peasantry, village elections, and stable modernization. Paper presented at International Symposium on Villager Self-government, Beijing, September.

    4.4.8 Article in newspapers:

    Notes:

    Keith B. Richburg, Foreign models flock to China, which embraces a Western vision of beauty, Washington Post, 26 December 2009, C01.

    Liu Shifa 柳士发, 实施创意世纪计划,开展创意中国行动 (Implement the creative century programme: Develop a creative China), 中国文化报 (China culture daily), 17 February 2004. 

    References:

    Richburg, Keith B. (2009) Foreign models flock to China, which embraces a Western vision of beauty. Washington Post, 26 December, C01.

    Liu, Shifa 柳士发 (2004) 实施创意世纪计划,开展创意中国行动 (Implement the creative century programme: Develop a creative China). 中国文化报 (China culture daily), 17 February. 

    4.4.9 Website

    Notes:

    Keith Bradsher, China’s incinerators loom as a global hazard, New York Times, 11 August 2009, http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/business/energy-environment/12incinera..., accessed 16 February 2013.

    中共中央关于全面深化改革若干重大问题的决定 (Decisions of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party on several important questions concerning the comprehensive deepening of reforms), § 48, 15 November 2013, http://cpc.people.com.cn/n/2013/1115/c64094-23559163-13.html, accessed 12 September 2014.

    References:

    Bradsher, Keith (2009) China’s incinerators loom as a global hazard. New York Times, 11 August. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/business/energy-environment/12incinera..., accessed 16 February 2013.

    中共中央关于全面深化改革若干重大问题的决定 (Decisions of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party on several important questions concerning the comprehensive deepening of reforms) (2013) 15 November. http://cpc.people.com.cn/n/2013/1115/c64094-23559163-13.html, accessed 12 September 2014.

    4.4.10 References to previously cited work:

    Family name, shortened title, (page number) (note: book title is italicized).

    Book:

    1 Chen (ed.), 中国刑事司法解释检讨.

    2 Kang, 仁政, 17.

    Article:

    1 Kang and Han, 分类控制, 30–41.

    2 Ibid., 33.

    Ibid. in roman type: ‘in the same work’

    This refers to a single work by the same author cited in the note immediately preceding. Ibid. should not be used if more than one work is cited in the preceding note. When moving sentences or sections from one place in the text to another, check whether or not the use of Ibid. in the accompanying notes is still appropriate.

    The use of abbreviations op. cit. and loc. cit. should be avoided.

    4.5 Supplementary material

    China Information does not currently accept supplemental files.

    4.6 English language editing services

    Authors seeking assistance with English language editing, translation, or figure and manuscript formatting to fit the journal’s specifications should consider using SAGE Language Services. Visit SAGE Language Services on our Journal Author Gateway for further information.

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    5. Submitting your manuscript

    Before submitting your manuscript, please ensure you carefully read and adhere to all the guidelines and instructions to authors provided below. Manuscripts not conforming to these guidelines may be returned. The title of the article should appear at the top of the first page. Please see point 8 below for the required manuscript style and layout.

    China Information is hosted on SAGE Track, a web based online submission and peer review system powered by ScholarOne™ Manuscripts. Visit https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cin to login and submit your article online.

    IMPORTANT: Please check whether you already have an account in the system before trying to create a new one. If you have reviewed or authored for the journal in the past year it is likely that you will have had an account created.  For further guidance on submitting your manuscript online please visit ScholarOne Online Help.

    5.1 ORCID

    As part of our commitment to ensuring an ethical, transparent and fair peer review process SAGE is a supporting member of ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID. ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes researchers from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between researchers and their professional activities ensuring that their work is recognised.

    We encourage all authors to add their ORCIDs to their SAGE Track accounts and include their ORCIDs as part of the submission process. If you don’t already have one you can create one here

    5.2 Information required for completing your submission

    You will be asked to provide contact details and academic affiliations for all co-authors via the submission system and identify who is to be the corresponding author. These details must match what appears on your manuscript. At this stage please ensure you have included all the required statements and declarations and uploaded any additional supplementary files (including reporting guidelines where relevant).

    5.3 Permissions

    Please also ensure that you have obtained any necessary permission from copyright holders for reproducing any illustrations, tables, figures or lengthy quotations previously published elsewhere. For further information including guidance on fair dealing for criticism and review, please see the Copyright and Permissions page on the SAGE Author Gateway.

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    6. On acceptance and publication

    6.1 SAGE Production

    Your SAGE Production Editor will keep you informed as to your article’s progress throughout the production process. Proofs will be sent by PDF to the corresponding author and should be returned promptly.  Authors are reminded to check their proofs carefully to confirm that all author information, including names, affiliations, sequence and contact details are correct, and that Funding and Conflict of Interest statements, if any, are accurate. Please note that if there are any changes to the author list at this stage all authors will be required to complete and sign a form authorising the change.

    6.2 Online First publication

    Online First allows final articles (completed and approved articles awaiting assignment to a future issue) to be published online prior to their inclusion in a journal issue, which significantly reduces the lead time between submission and publication. Visit the SAGE Journals help page for more details, including how to cite Online First articles.

    6.3 Access to your published article

    SAGE provides authors with online access to their final article

    6.4 Promoting your article

    Publication is not the end of the process! You can help disseminate your paper and ensure it is as widely read and cited as possible. The SAGE Author Gateway has numerous resources to help you promote your work. Visit the Promote Your Article page on the Gateway for tips and advice. In addition, SAGE is partnered with Kudos, a free service that allows authors to explain, enrich, share, and measure the impact of their article. Find out how to maximise your article’s impact with Kudos.

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    7. Further information

    Any correspondence, queries or additional requests for information on the manuscript submission process should be sent to the https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cin editorial office as follows:

    Tak-Wing Ngo, Editor
    cin.sagepub@gmail.com

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