Organizational Research Methods
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Organizational Research Methods

2015 Impact Factor: 4.727
2015 Ranking: 9/192 in Management | 2/79 in Psychology, Applied
2016 Release of Journal Citation Reports, Source: 2015 Web of Science Data

Editor
James M. LeBreton The Pennsylvania State University, USA


eISSN: 15527425| ISSN: 10944281|Current volume: 19|Current issue: 3 Frequency: Quarterly

Organizational Research Methods (ORM) was established to bring relevant methodological developments to the attention of a broad range of researchers working in areas represented within the domains of the organizational sciences. An important goal of ORM is to promote a more effective understanding of current and new methodologies as applied in organizational research. Thus, articles should be understandable to a general audience and should assume background knowledge consistent with methodological and statistical training provided in contemporary organizational sciences doctoral programs. Authors should use the latter statement as a primary consideration when deciding whether to submit to ORM. This does not mean that new methodological and statistical procedures and concepts cannot be introduced. Indeed, this is highly encouraged and welcomed.

Several types of articles are appropriate for ORM. One type of article addresses questions about existing quantitative and qualitative methods and research designs currently used by organizational researchers and may involve a comparison of alternative available methods. Articles of this nature should focus on the relative strengths and weaknesses of the analytical technique(s) presented. A second type of article demonstrates new applications of existing quantitative or qualitative methods to substantive questions in organizational research. These articles should address the manner in which the new applications advance understanding of organizational research. A third type of article introduces methodological developments or techniques from other disciplines to organizational researchers. For these articles, the relative advantages of the new techniques should be clearly discussed. ORM also includes several reoccurring features including essays on methods, point/counterpoint debates, methods reviews, and computer software reviews. Articles that do not fit these categories may be submitted to ORM, as long as they are written in a manner consistent with the objectives stated above.

If the submission is a Monte Carlo simulation, the results must advance our understanding of the nature or use of a statistical technique in the context of organizational research. Authors must demonstrate that the issue being addressed has implications for "real" organizational situations. While the simulated data provide internal validity in some measure, it should be the author’s responsibility to show how the issue or topic of interest generalizes to “real” organizational situations and the implications of it doing so. One means of doing so could be the use of real data in parallel. Another means is to design the simulation using information from the literature to mimic real situations. Simulations should be described in sufficient detail so that readers could replicate the methodology.

Finally, scale or measurement development manuscripts that are applications of standard and established measurement development procedures are not encouraged. Manuscripts, however, that challenge standard and established measurement development procedures and present something new with respect to those procedures are encouraged.

Prospective authors must specify that their manuscript is not under consideration at another journal and that is has not been published elsewhere in substantially similar form or with substantially similar content. Further, if the manuscript represents a substantial revision of a previously rejected manuscript from ORM, it must be identified as such with the previous manuscript number and a letter outlining why you feel it should be considered in its new form.


 

Organizational Research Methods (ORM) was established to bring relevant methodological developments to the attention of a broad range of researchers working in areas represented within the domains of the organizational sciences. An important goal of ORM is to promote a more effective understanding of current and new methodologies as applied in organizational research. Thus, articles should be understandable to a general audience and should assume background knowledge consistent with methodological and statistical training provided in contemporary organizational sciences doctoral programs. Authors should use the latter statement as a primary consideration when deciding whether to submit to ORM. This does not mean that new methodological and statistical procedures and concepts cannot be introduced. Indeed, this is highly encouraged and welcomed.

Several types of articles are appropriate for ORM. One type of article addresses questions about existing quantitative and qualitative methods and research designs currently used by organizational researchers and may involve a comparison of alternative available methods. Articles of this nature should focus on the relative strengths and weaknesses of the analytical technique(s) presented. A second type of article demonstrates new applications of existing quantitative or qualitative methods to substantive questions in organizational research. These articles should address the manner in which the new applications advance understanding of organizational research. A third type of article introduces methodological developments or techniques from other disciplines to organizational researchers. For these articles, the relative advantages of the new techniques should be clearly discussed. ORM also includes several reoccurring features including essays on methods, point/counterpoint debates, methods reviews, and computer software reviews. Articles that do not fit these categories may be submitted to ORM, as long as they are written in a manner consistent with the objectives stated above.

If the submission is a Monte Carlo simulation, the results must advance our understanding of the nature or use of a statistical technique in the context of organizational research. Authors must demonstrate that the issue being addressed has implications for "real" organizational situations. While the simulated data provide internal validity in some measure, it should be the author’s responsibility to show how the issue or topic of interest generalizes to “real” organizational situations and the implications of it doing so. One means of doing so could be the use of real data in parallel. Another means is to design the simulation using information from the literature to mimic real situations. Simulations should be described in sufficient detail so that readers could replicate the methodology.

Finally, scale or measurement development manuscripts that are applications of standard and established measurement development procedures are not encouraged. Manuscripts, however, that challenge standard and established measurement development procedures and present something new with respect to those procedures are encouraged.

Prospective authors must specify that their manuscript is not under consideration at another journal and that is has not been published elsewhere in substantially similar form or with substantially similar content. Further, if the manuscript represents a substantial revision of a previously rejected manuscript from ORM, it must be identified as such with the previous manuscript number and a letter outlining why you feel it should be considered in its new form.

Associate Editors
John Antonakis University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Brian K. Boyd City University of Hong Kong, China
Robert P. Gephart, Jr. University of Alberta, Canada
Thomas Greckhamer Louisiana State University, USA
Lisa Lambert Georgia State University, USA
Adam W. Meade North Carolina State University, USA
Daniel A. Newman University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Anne D. Smith The University of Tennessee
Louis Tay Purdue University, USA
Scott Tonidandel Davidson College
Editorial Assistant
Kayla Weaver Pennsylvania State University, USA
Editorial Board
Chahrazad Abdallah Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Canada
Herman Aguinis George Washington University, USA
Mats Alvesson Lund University, Sweden
Boris B. Baltes Wayne State University
Daniel J. Beal The University of Texas at San Antonio
Donald D. Bergh University of Denver, USA
Mark N. Bing University of Mississippi
Paul D. Bliese University of South Carolina, USA
Boris F Blumberg Maastricht University, The Netherlands
Stephanie A. Bohon University of Tennessee, USA
Michael T. Braun Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Nathan T. Carter University of Georgia
Gilad Chen University of Maryland
Gordon W. Cheung The University of Auckland, New Zealand
Jose M. Cortina George Mason University
Kai S. Cortina University of Michigan
Cynthia S. Cycyota United States Air Force Academy, USA
Per Davidsson QUT Business School
H. Kristl Davison University of Mississippi
Jeremy F. Dawson Aston University
Rich DeJordy Northeastern University, USA
Richard P. DeShon Michigan State University, USA
Joerg Dietz University of Lausanne
Fritz Drasgow University of Illinois
Jeffrey R. Edwards University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Mark B. Gavin West Virginia University
Michael J. Gill University of Bath, UK
Jodi S. Goodman West Virginia University
Andrew Hayes Ohio State University
Paul Hibbert University of St. Andrews, UK
Timothy Hinkin Cornell University School of Hotel Administration
Gazi Islam Grenoble Ecole de Management, France
Jeff Johnson Maryland, USA
John D. Kammeyer-Mueller University of Minnesota
Seth A. Kaplan George Mason University, USA
Tine Köhler University of Melbourne, Australia
Dina Krasikova University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
David M. LaHuis Wright State University
Charles E. Lance Organizational Research & Development, LLC
Ronald S. Landis Illinois Institute of Technology
Jane K. Lê The University of Sydney, Australia
Songqi Liu Georgia State University, USA
Karen Locke College of William and Mary, USA
Franz Lohrke Samford University
John E. Mathieu University of Connecticut
Scott B. Morris Illinois Institute of Technology
Frederick L. Oswald Rice University
Rebecca Piekkari Helsinki School of Economics, Finland
Charles A. Pierce The University of Memphis, USA
Robert E. Ployhart University of South Carolina
Dan J. Putka HumRRO
Rhonda K. Reger The University of Tennessee
Mikko Rönkkö Aalto University, Finland
Linda Rouleau HEC Montréal, Canada
Terri A. Scandura University of Miami, USA
Neal Schmitt Michigan State University
Steven E. Scullen Drake University
Dean A. Shepherd Indiana University
Jeremy C. Short University of Oklahoma
Hock-Peng Sin Florida International University
Christiane Spitzmüller University of Houston
Michael C. Sturman Cornell University School of Hotel Administration, USA
Robert J. Vandenberg University of Georgia
Jean-Philippe Vergne INSA-Lyon, France
Larry J. Williams Wayne State University (1998-2004)
David J. Woehr University of North Carolina-Charlotte
Sang Eun Woo Purdue University, USA
Robert Wright Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China
Zhen Zhang Arizona State University
Michael J. Zickar Bowling Green State University, USA
Michael J. Zyphur The University of Melbourne, Australia
Founding Editor
Larry J. Williams Wayne State University (1998-2004)
Past Editors
Herman Aguinis (2005-2007) Indiana University
Robert J. Vandenberg (2008-2010) University of Georgia
José M. Cortina (2011-2013) George Mason University
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  • Organizational Research Methods (ORM) was established to bring relevant methodological developments to the attention of a broad range of researchers working in areas represented within the domains of the organizational sciences. An important goal of ORM is to promote an effective understanding of current and new methodologies as applied in organizational research. Thus, articles should be understandable to a general audience and should assume background knowledge consistent with methodological and statistical training provided in contemporary organizational sciences doctoral programs. Authors should use the latter statement as a primary consideration when deciding whether to submit to ORM. This does not mean that new methodological and statistical procedures and concepts cannot be introduced. Indeed, this is highly encouraged and welcomed.

    Several types of articles are appropriate for ORM. One type addresses questions about existing quantitative and qualitative methods and research designs currently used by organizational researchers and may involve a comparison of alternative available methods. Articles of this nature should focus on the relative strengths and weaknesses of the analytical technique(s) presented. A second type of article demonstrates new applications of existing quantitative or qualitative methods to substantive questions in organizational research. These articles should address the manner in which the new applications advance understanding of organizational research. A third type of article introduces methodological developments or techniques from other disciplines to organizational researchers. For these articles, the relative advantages of the new techniques should be clearly discussed. ORM also includes several reoccurring features including essays on methods, point/counterpoint debates, methods reviews, and computer software reviews. Articles that do not fit these categories may be submitted to ORM, as long as they are written in a manner consistent with the objectives stated above. Finally, scale or measurement development manuscripts that are applications of standard and established measurement development procedures are not encouraged. Manuscripts, however, that challenge and/or advance standard and established measurement development procedures and present something new with respect to those procedures are encouraged.

    Prospective authors must specify that their manuscript is not under consideration at another journal and that it has not been published elsewhere in substantially similar form or with substantially similar content. Further, if the manuscript represents a substantial revision of a previously rejected manuscript from ORM, it must be identified as such with the previous manuscript number and a letter outlining why you feel it should be considered in its new form.

    Manuscripts should be submitted electronically via SAGE Track. Authors will be required to set up an online account on the SAGE Track system powered by ScholarOne. After logging in, submissions are completed through your Author Center. Your title should be no more than 20 words, and your abstract no more than 180 words, accompanied by 3-5 keywords. Authors must submit a SEPARATE cover page with (1) article title; (2) first name, middle initial, and last name of each author; (3) names of institutions to which each author is affiliated, along with complete addresses and e-mail addresses; (4) a brief biographical sketch (maximum 50 words) for each author; and (5) any acknowledgments, financial disclosure information, author notes, and/or other text that could identify the authors to reviewers. The manuscript to be uploaded should be completely devoid of any author identification, and be prepared using Microsoft Word. It should be ONE file starting with the abstract on page 1 and with the text starting on page 2. Following the text, arrange endnotes, references, appendices, and tables, in this order. Figures should be submitted in their original, native format, and only included in the manuscript file if they were created in Word. Manuscripts should generally not exceed 30 pages inclusive, and should follow the style guidelines of the American Psychological Association (current edition). 

    Authors must also complete the Contributor Agreement. For additional information on editorial policies and ORM, please contact the editor, Dr. James M. LeBreton, at the telephone number or email address below.

    Organizational Research Methods, Sage Publications, Inc.
    Sponsored by the Research Methods Division, Academy of Management

    James M. LeBreton, Editor
    Organizational Research Methods
    Department of Psychology
    Pennsylvania State University
    140 Moore Building
    University Park, PA 16802
    Phone: (814) 865-9514
    Fax: (814) 863-7002
    Email: james.lebreton@psu.edu

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